1865s Kaki Walking suit (HSM 7/2017)

HSM 7/2017 – Fashion Plate

I knew from the start this challenge would be an easy one (or hard, depending on how you see it), cause I often use pictures and extant garment as my inspiration. The only trouble was to pick which one to make.

But since my sister needed a new 1860s outfit for an upcoming event and I already had this pic saved on my ” wish to make someday” list, The choice turned out easier then expected.
Fashion plate from 1862

Close-up on the outfit I planed to make.

I also looked at some extant garments for additional inspiration and style choices. Then I got to work.

Using two beige cotton sheets from IKEA.
I started by cutting the skirt and used the same method and calculations as my latest 1860s dress, stitching the skirt together. This time it went a lot faster, since I already had the measurements and the technique down.

Once it was stitched and hemmed (after quick fitting) I added a singel row of braid around the bottom. Even though my insoiration din’t have one, I really liked the way t looked, and how it connected with the decoration to be made on the jacket.   

Then it was time for the jacket.

After some quick research and studying of pattern-diagrams and extant jackets on the internet I drafted my own pattern from my usual modern templates.

Then I stitched it together, inserted the double sleeves, added lining and begun working on the trimming.

 I used the same furniture braid as on the skirt combined with a brown pom-pom trim also from my stash.
Even though they weren’t a perfect match color-wise the effect was really nice.

A quick pic of the just “finished” outfit on the floor. Now all that was needed was some pressing and the right accessories. 

The finished dress: 

Just the facts:

Challenge: Nr 7 2017 – Fashion plate
“Make an outfit inspired by a fashion plate […]”

What: A 1860s Walking ensamble – Skirt and Zouvare Jacket)

Pattern: None – I drafted my own based on pictures and pattern drafts from the time.

Fabric & Notions: 2 beige cotton sheets (150 x 200cm/each), thread, hook and eye for skirt closure, 6 m of tapestry braid and 2 m of pom-pom trim.

How historical accurate: So so – The look and the pattern are good, but the fabric is way to thin and should have been either a thin wool or a heavier cotton. Also it’s stretching it a bit time wise by saying they used sewing-machines at this time, so thats another “wrong”. Maybe 7/10

Time: About 10 hours. more  then half of which went into hemming and trimming by hand.

Cost: About 150-200 Sek (all trim was in my stash from a notions clear-out a few years ago)

First worn: On June 10 for “The day of the Big Crinolines”.

Final thoughts: I think it turned out pretty good. My sister looked like she had fun wearing it and the whole outfit came together really well.

 

18th century Outlander Garb

After studying the various looks of the character Clare in the series “Outlander”, comparing them to the fabrics from my stash I decided to go for the simple laced up jacket and skirt that’s became symbolic with the series.4714dc59393b6c63c5000f447531e4c3

I started by making a skirt out of some plaid wool I found in my stash (which I’ve bought on sale about a year ago).IMG_8618

The construction is really simple, since it’s basically two widths of the fabric sewn together and gathered to a waistband.IMG_8623I used some linen scraps for he hem facing and hooks and bars to close the waistband.

The finished skirt: IMG_8646

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Then I started on the bodice.
Using the pattern from the yellow caraco jacket, only changing the front to accommodate a stomacher instead of button closer, and adding a peplum at the bottom edge.

I used some leftover beige wool for the jacket, interlining it with some linen scraps and dark green wool for the stomacher – all made to match the plaid of the skirt.20150906_105227_resized

It went together pretty fast even though I made it completely by hand.IMG_8629

IMG_8628The peplum being attached.

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Trying the jacket on my dressform.

I attached the lining made from two different pieces f left over cotton sheets. IMG_8640

Then it was time for the eyelets to be made, using a separate fabric strip attached hidden under the boned front edge.20150919_183851

The finial thing to make was to ad channels and boning to the stomacher.IMG_8685

The skirt and jacket ready to be packed for the photoshoot. 20150920_125242

The finished outfit/jacket:IMG_8657

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Just the facts:

What: A 18th century jacket and skirt.

Pattern: The jacket is my own draft (yellow Caraco jacket), and the skirt is just two rectangles stitched together.

Fabric & Notions: Skirt – 2,2 m plaid wool, thread and hook & bar.
The bodice: 1 m beige(left over) wool, 1,5 m white cotton for lining and interning, m cotton cord, thread, buttonhole thread, 60 cm plastic boning.

Cost: Everything came from stash but 300 sek would be a fair calculation.

Time: Pretty fast for a complete hand made costume – about 20-25 hours for the whole outfit.

Final thoughts: I really like this outfit. It’s warm and cosy and I really enjoyed wearing it for the photoshoot.

The “Outlander” outfit:IMG_8652

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Tavern Wench/Maid – photoshoot

Her are the photos of my recently finished Maid Costume.

I’m wearing:
The Yellow Caraco jacket (part 1 & part 2), brown short skirt,  stays, quilted petticoat, and accessories as cap, fichu, apron, bumpads, stockings, black shoes, bible and a cross necklase.
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German maid, evidence of patterned jacket worn with solid skirt - kopiaInspiration

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IMG_5974“This is my favourite part… but I’m having a bit trouble living by it…”

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IMG_4690Photos: Elin Evaldsdottra och Maria Petersson

Stash-busting 18th century Caraco (part 2)

Here comes the finishing steps of making my yellow Caraco jacket (read Part 1).

After the assembling of the bodice, and insertion of the lining to the jacket, it was time for the clouser.
Since it is was a stash-busting challenge, I knew I needed to find some solution in my own bins. And after some searching I did. 20 small buttons.IMG_5043Trying out the layout on the pattern, 10 on the bodice front and 5 each on the sleeves.

Even though hey might have worked as they where, I decided to cover them in self fabric.IMG_5156Cutting small circles to cover the buttons, making sure the purple stripe is centered on all of them.

Then it was time to start on the buttonholes.IMG_5380Markings and buttonholes on the sleeves.

And on to the bodice front.IMG_5400Pinning the edges together to mark the button placement through the buttonholes.

Once the clouser was done, I thought it looked pretty shabby, puckering and not laying flat at all.IMG_5404

Thankfully the problem was adverted once I realized I hadn’t pressed the buttonholes properly.
And once I did they looked so much better.

IMG_5407Hard to tell from this picture, but the difference are really obvious in real life.
Lesson learnt – don’t cheat on the pressing!

Then it was time to attach the sleeves.
I stitched them from the inside and covered the raw edges with a bias tape (also left-over scraps) IMG_5497

Then I finished the jacket by inserting a few plastic bones in the front and back seams, giving it a good press and putting it on the dressform for pictures. IMG_5496The purple lining makes me so happy.

Finished:IMG_5455

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Just the facts:

Challenge: nr 3/2015 Stash-busting

What: A 1780-1790s working class jacket

Pattern: A combination of the “Kofta KM 25.429 (jacket) pattern from “Skräddaren, sömmerskna och modet” (“the Tailor, the Seamstress and the Fashion”) and Nehelenia patterns nr E21 1790s Redingote.

Fabric: 1,5m of yellow/lilac striped cotton, 2 m of purple cotton for lining and interlining.

Notions: Thread (purple and yellow), yellow buttonhole thread, 4 cable ties for boning and 10 buttons.

How historical accurate: As much as I could, and to the best of my abilities. The fabric and colors are plausible, the patterns and construction are accurate and came from good sources. I hand stitched the whole garment using period techniques. The only thing I can think of that not right are the use of plastic boning and polyester thread for the buttonholes. I give it 8/10.

Cost: 10 Sek (1,6 Usd) since almost everything came from stash and was leftovers from previous projects. The only thing I bought was the yellow buttonhole thread.
But if you would buy it all anew I’d say about 250 Sek (36 Usd).

Time: It went pretty fast considering it is all hand sewn. About 10-15 hours I think.

First Worn: on February 28 for photos. I started the jacket with the intention of wearing it to a 18th century Tavern Event in beginning of February. But as it happened I newer went. Hopefully I will get another chance later this spring.

Motivation/ How It fit into the Challenge: Even though it did not use up a lot of fabric, I think the jacket serves the challenge both in using leftover stash fabrics and notions, and in helping me re-discover all the little pieces of left over fabrics I already own.
I also think the garment itself is suitable as the women who wore such jackets would not be splurging on new fabrics.

Final Thoughts: I really loved making this jacket. It was such a joy how fast and easy it came together, and I think it looks adorable. I want to make lots more of these jackets.

IMG_5489Accessorized and ready for more pictures.

Stash-busting 18th century Caraco (part 1)

I found this fashion plate on Pinerest in early January an knew immediately I wanted to make something similar for an 18th century Tavern event I planed to attending in early February (unfortunately life happened and I ended up not going, but at least now I have a costume if the opportunity arises again).

German maid, evidence of patterned jacket worn with solid skirt - kopiaI made the skirt and shortened my apron to match.

Then it was on to the jacket.

In the book “Skräddaren sömmerskan och modet” by Rasmussen, I found the description and pattern for this jacket called a “Kofta” which translates to “a kind of soft jacket”. IMG_5036With it’s short front, tails/peplum at the back and long sleeves, it was perfect!

For pattern I used the “Kofta”-pattern combined with my new favorite 18th century pattern, the “1790s Redingote” from Nehelenia Patterns.IMG_5030

I made a franken-pattern, using parts of this and parts of that to get the shape as I wanted. IMG_5039

Then I cut and made a mock-up.
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IMG_5061The fit was surprisingly good, and all I needed to do was to lower the neckline a bit (I made the decision to make a wide neckline instead of the high one from the fashion plate), and trim the peplum a bit.

Then it was on to the fabric.
Keeping in with my New years resolution, I decided to go through the stash before heading to the store.
That turned out to be a really good thing, since I found exactly what I needed – A soft yellow cotton with purple stripes in a odd (left over) length, that would be on exactly enough for his project. And a purple cotton lawn I previously used for mock-ups, which would be great for lining and interlining. IMG_5044Then I realized that this project would fit perfectly into the HSM/15 nr 3 – Stashbusting, and did a little happy dance (to my hubby’s surprise).

I cut the pieces one layer at the time, to make sure to line all the stripes perfectly. IMG_5079Laying the first layer up side down on the second layer makes it possible to perfectly match everything.IMG_5082

I basted the whole garment together for a first try on.
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Some minor alterations like shortening the sleeves and lower the neckline a bit more was all that needed to be made.

I stitched the pieces together using period techniques (stitching from the outside),IMG_5148 making sure to line the stripes properly.

IMG_5150From the inside you can see the purple interning and boning channels sewn into the seam allowance.

IMG_5147I love the look of the bodice like this – perhaps I need to make a waistcoat from this pattern.

To be continued…

1850s Paisley Day-bodice

After finishing the 1850s skirt for the 14th HSF challenge I started on the jacket.
I knew I wanted a fitted jacket with a bit of a peplum and a sculpted neckpiece on top, like the ones in Nancy Bradfeilds “Costume in Detail” DSC_1449 (1)

Draping the pieces on my dressform.
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And the neckpiece.
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I then cut and made a mock-up, and let it rest upon my dressform for a week when we were abroad on vaccation.
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Coming home again, I put it on to check the fit.
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It did needed some changes (hard to se in this pick due to the pining I’ve made on the inside), but for the most part it worked pretty good.

IMG_0009Trying out the sleeve pattern.

IMG_0013The biggest change I neede to make was to lover the wasit and to take it in a bit more.

Here you can see the new lower, and the old un-picked waist placement, and the amount needed to be taken in at each seam. IMG_0014

Then it was time to cut the pieces.IMG_0017I needed to ration the fabric very carefuly to make sure I had enough to get the print matched on each piece. It was a bit tricky but I manadged to fit all the pieces pretty much the way I wanted.

I’m particulary proud of the center back (which unfortanly won’t even show beeneth the neck piece).IMG_0018After basting the interlinig to the paisley, I sewed the pieces together and tried it on.
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This time it looked rater good.

When I was sure about the fit, I cut all the wide seam allowence down, and trimmed away all the exess fabric at the darts.IMG_0064Huge un-cut and cut dart.

Then it  was time for the linnig, which I putt in using the “bag method”. and to make sure all the edges would turn nicely I made notches in the allowence of all the curved seams.IMG_0094Notches on the neck-seam.

All this trimming and notching left my sewing room a mess. IMG_0097Lots of thread and fabric scraps.

I also took the time to under- stich the neck and hem to make sure the edges was nice and crisp, and would not be able to peek out.
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Then it was time for the boning. Well actually I should have done this before putting in the lining, but forgot and thous needed to do it the harder way, trying to avoid getting the lining intangeled with the chanels.IMG_0123anyhow, I sewed the boning chanals to the seam allowences using self made bias-strips. Then I cut, shaped and put in the plastic whalebone, starting on the sleeves.

IMG_0120The jacket almost done, inside-out, on my sewing table.

When the bones and the sleeves were inserted and the lining was sewed down nicely it was time to deal with the clouer of the garmnent. I used several self covered buttons and stiched them to the front. IMG_0072But since I didn’t had the energy (nor time) to make buttonholes I put the buttons on the outside, and stitched hooks and bars underneat to use as clouser.

And lastly I pinned and sewed on the brown fringe to the edge of the neckpiece.IMG_0142This is the only fringe I’ve ver used, and I love how it’s sewed at the end to prevent the fringes from getting caught in your stiches. When finished sewing you just cut the stich away, and you have a nice straight fringe. It’s great.

The finished dress (Jacket and Skirt)IMG_0144

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Just the facts:

Challenge: nr 14: Paisley & Plaid.

What: a 1850 daydress (bodice and skirt).

Pattern: None, draped my own using “Costume in detail” as a general guide.

Fabric: Two bedsheets with duvet covets from IKEA, 1,5 white cotton sheets for lining and 1 m cotton twill for interlining.

Notions: Jacket – Thread, 3 m of plastic boning, 3 m of self mde bisatape, 12 buttons, 14 pair of hooks adn eyes, 1,5 m of brown fringe. and only thread and hook and eye for the skirt.

How Historical accurate: So so. I think it does look the part but I’m not sure about the messy pattern. Cotton is legit and paisley was a popular pattern during this time, but I doubt that the dressmaker using cotton in her daydress would have had a sewingmachine.

Time: About 15-20 hours total.

Cost: 300 Sek (48 Usd) for the whole dress.

First worn: Ony for photos so far. I meent to wear it at a victorian picknic in july but the weater was way to hot for all the layers, so ended up using another costume instead.

Final thoughts: I’m not totaly happy about how messy the print looks made up in this dress. And I could have spent some more time getting the pattern to mach up and also making the neckpiece fit better.
All in all I think it was a funny project and I hope I get to wear it sometime.