2017 – Planing Ahead

As we go deeper into January 2017, its time to plan this years sewing.

Yay!

This year I did things a little differently then usual (where I just pic ALL the things), because having a small baby really eats away of your sewing time 😉
So, this year I picked All the things I want to sew..

…and then I removed half of them.
All costumes with lots of pieces/decorations/complicated (and time consuming) elements had to go. Sorry, Not sorry.

Then I took a hard and “realistic” (yeah right) look at what was manageable with approx 1-3 hours sewing a week (more, if I could use nap time at its fullest but that’s hardly likely).

Then I took a look at my stash (because after half a year of maternity leave you really need to cut back on the excesses, like fabrics) and added that account into the ekvation.

And lastly I run everything through the eyes of the “Historical sew monthly” and possible events to come, and tried my best to match everything up.

So, after lots of forth and back, here is what i plan to make during 2017:
(Presented through the HSM17 lineup)

 The Historical Sew Monthly 2017:
(January-July)

January:
Firsts & LastsCreate either the first item in a new ensemble, or one last piece to put the final fillip on an outfit.

8b05963d5ee97df4f28e42f9f5f09e09I begun the work on the apron on this fashion plate back in December and it will be both my first entry into 1810-20s (late Regency), and possibly the last piece of this ensemble I can finish this year (even though I would love to make the dress and bonnet as well).
And for the purpose of this challenge the apron will be the first item on this ensemble and the last ting to put on before leaving the home.

February:
Re-Make, Re-Use, Re-Fashion
Sew something that pays homage to the historical idea of re-using, re-making and re-fashioning.

For this one I have two dresses that I would love to re-make to a better fit and perhaps even a better design.

IMG_2031 This 1780s Robe needs to be fitted better over my “new” stays, and perhaps let out a tad in the sleeves.

IMG_0522This 1910s evening gown needs a nicer back closure, and I think it would look better with the draping a bit more stitched down and controlled.

March:
The Great Outdoors
Get out into the weather and dirt with an item for outdoor pursuits.

I’m not quite sure on what to make for this one yet, but I would love to make either a Regency Spencerempire2

Or this 1910s wrap cape.4208693c640de62d4b97f0ac6ec639fdBeautiful, Isn’t it?

Another thing I’m contemplating is to make a 18th century hair decoration to match the brown Robe Anglaise above. fbac9dca5d32b7a9e85ab39e839c26ea 650e2205c62d97b75a2e1ba7ad3e4a16
Something like these two mixed up

April:
Circles, Squares & Rectangles
Make a garment made entirely of squares, rectangles and circles.

1237560510215538790warszawianka_chiton_clothing-svg-hiOn this one I plan to keep it simple with a Greek Chiton or Peplos made from one/two big rectangles of fabric.

I might also get time to make the frilly 1820s bonnet from January’s fashion plate.

May:
Literature
– Make something inspired by literature.

Also not sure on this one.
I would love to make a new Edwardian evening gown (if some of my fabrics speaks to me)mode1910-2

Or a green Regency day dress (or maybe a Pelisse) out of a pretty cotton fabric I’ve been sitting on for a few years now.5880ee0d1aa5d43db828e03caa587e55

Or I might just take this opportunity to finish my Robe a la Franchaise (begun in 2014)
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The literature reference won’t be hard to find on either of them.

June:
Metallics
make something in silver, gold, bronze, and copper, whether it be an actual metal, cloth of gold or silver, or lamé.

I was planing on making one of these 1-hour dresses from the 1920s in a lovely turquoise jewel toned fake silk, but now that I read the challenge description again I realize that won’t do.ladda-nedPerhaps I can add some sparkle or a nice piece of jewelry to go with the dress, to make it fit the challenge criteria better.

July:
Fashion Plate
Make an outfit inspired by a fashion plate, whether it is a direct replica, or a more toned down version that fits the resources and lifestyle of the character you are portraying.

Another Regency piece I’ve been coveting for a while is a greek inspired over robe like his one.eveningfulldresslabelleassembleeapril1811

For the rest of the year (Aug-Dec) I want to wait a bit to decide what to do, since life and priorities change depending on sewing time/up-coming events or new interests.

So the last 5 challenges will be decided later this spring/summer.

AugustRidiculous 

SeptemberSeen Onscreen

OctoberOut of Your Comfort Zone

NovemberHSF Inspiration

DecemberGo Wild

Here is however some of the things I’m thinking about

A new 17th century evening bodiceelizabeth-capell-countess-of-carnarvon-ca-1665-sir-peter-lely

A 15th century Burgundian gownspinning-women1

A sheer Regency gown to dress up/down depending on occasion. 28187ad2219cb5718f1b8e6e7609ab73

A man’s Regency waistcoatk4202drw

Of course I also plan to make lots of new baby clothes and perhaps one or two modern dresses/shirts for myself.

Lets see what I can get done 🙂

Elizabeth I – Costume analysis

One of the costumes I wanted to make since I first became interested in historical costumes is the yellow dress from the Movie “Elizabeth” (1998), and last year I decided it was time.
The October theme for HSM2015 was “Silver screen”,  and since I acquired the perfect fabric a couple of months before I made grand plans to make the dress during the fall.

Then life happened (Jupp, baby haze), so this summer,when I finally had the energy to once more dream of pretty dresses, the yellow dress was not far from my mid.
And then when the HSM16s theme “Hero”, lined up with an growing itch to sew and grand planes for Halloween, I knew that the time had come, at last.

So lets take a look at the Dress:

(Pictures from “Costumers guide“)
elizabeth-1It’s made in a yellow/golden brocade with a snakeskin feel to the fabric.
The bodice are stiff and ends in a deep point at center front.

ref5The skirt are worn over layers of petticoats and probably a big bumpad to get the hips really wide and rounded. It’s either parted at front over a identical petticoat or pleated to look like it’s open. I think its the later, which you can better see in other pics.

ref17The line of the dress are slim and soft with a flat bodice front and rounded hips.

ref19The skirt are pleated  to the waist all around and opens up at the back. Even though you can’t see it in this pic I’m fairly sure the bodice laces up the back (as most of the dresses in the move has this somewhat un-historical feature). You can however see the sleeves and the delicate buttons (which I later decided to leave of my version).

ref26The neckline is square with a slight angle.

ref31Behind the scenes worn with a neck-ruff.

ref23The dress is worn during the coronation styled with a massive coronation robe and beautiful regalia.

fidm1Here you can better see the pleating of the skirt and the impressive point on the bodice.

2f65df3f3eea3f0f56e60e15cd347accI’m actually not sure if this picture are of the movie original or if its a great copy but i’s beautiful on the les.

english-school-koenigin-elisabeth-i-in-kroenungskleidern-123215The painting the movie based everything of.

1490s Borgia dress – costume study

Have you seen the Showtime series “The Borgias”?
(I know it’s a few years old but I don’t care)
Bildresultat för the borgiasIt’s a wonderful series About the 15th century pop Alexander VI and it’s full of betrails, sex, murder but most of all gorgeous costumes.
As far as history is concerned the show does lack a bit (inspired by the life of Alexander, would be a more accurate description), but costume wise they pretty much nailed it. And it looks beautiful.

Some real inspiration:
italian-venetian-fashion-clothing-16-century-early-modernThe left one is one of my favorite dresses and totally on my “to-do” list.

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And some of my favorites from the show:
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holiday-grangier-borgias-tvfash-1-325

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Pretty, Yes?

And before you have to ask, of course I wanted to make my own Italian dress.

After some thinking I narrowed it down to two main inspiration dresses from the series

Dress nr 1 The-Borgias-the-borgias-19420145-375-500I know he is gorgeous but lets try to focus on the dress…

tumblr_mumap5hf8M1qib0lto1_500Lovely light blue and gold coloring. I also love the lacing on the bodice and the sheerness of the chemise.

b39be5f92f6e0fc969a67e14e268f1fe

6e469769c298f469f20c55f72f55103dpretty profile

Dress nr 2;tumblr_lt0cgyMJUB1qiu1coo3_400

tumblr_mc079qPab21r4sg4ao2_250Perfection

While studying the pics I noticed that they actually reused the dress above in season 2 with a few alterations (new sleeves).holiday-grangier-borgias-tvfash-3-325

I actually think it is pretty great that they re-used the dress. No one, no mater how rich you where, could afford a new dress every day and to newer up-cycle your old favorite styles to the current fashion.

I also got tipped of that Showtime was offering this exact dress up for sale on their website.

Caption:
“Lucrezia Borgia, played by Holliday Grainger wears a sky blue embroidered gown in Season 2 of The Borgias during the baptism of her son, Giovanni. Includes the sleeves later added to the gown.

The gown is impeccably tailored with a full lining. The details are never ending, with each little turn revealing another pristine element. The piece was designed and constructed by expert period costume designer Gabriella Pescucci and worn by Holliday Grainger on set. The dress corset-laces up the back with the outer layer fastening by hook and eye.”00466503-959462_1000

cdb1e10373bdf8e918811e1e8b441d6c

The Borgias Lucrezia Borgia's Blue Dress with Sleeves

Did I mention these dresses are BEAUTIFUL… 😉

 

My (everyday) pregnancy style

As we all know, being pregnant do some things to your body (and mind).
Things that makes your morning routine take some extra time, and I’m not talking about morning sickness or the constant trips to the toilet – I’m talking of the head scratching process of dressing.

In the beginning (at least for me, I know everyone have it differently) you just feel bloated, unattractive and with a greenish tint to your complexion. Though wearing your normal clothes still works, if only a bit snug, some people prefer to wear cute little dresses with a bow tied on top. This was not an option for me, since we decided to wait quite some time before announcing to anyone that I was expecting.
So usual clothes it was – Even though I didn’t choose the most figure hugging tops in my wardrobe, (and thanks to Swedish autumn and winter just around the corner I could easily hide in bulky knits and cosy sweatshirts.

I was lucky enough to be able to wear my winter jacket the whole winter (it was a close one though, had spring hesitated a week more I would have been forced to get another one).

When spring arrived and my belly started to show for real, I bought a pair of pregnancy pants from a known two lettered fashion store, and kept wearing my usual tops and shirts. Everything with enough stretch in them would work. I also frequently used a pair of soft lose pants tied under the bump.
After a while I needed to add a long tank-top beneath my regular tops as my expanding belly made them look shorter and shorter.IMG_9754Comfortable loose pants, slim dress worn as a top and white belt.
pregnant in: week 39*

IMG_20160510_133456_resizedThere is no way that sweater will close…
week 37

In May my belly was really growing fast and I could literally see the changes each morning. I got myself a new pair of maternity jeans (the old pair was quite worn out by this time), and even splurged on a pair of denim shorts. 20160509_081328_resized_1Summer style – also, notice the sensible walking shoes
week 36

I did attend a few parties during the spring, and in the beginning had some trouble finding a nice dress to wear.
I bought a lavender blue pregnancy dress in January for these occasions, but when time come to put it on, it never felt right. In stead I raided my own closet, and found several dresses that would work.2016-03-14_20.03.36_resizedThe maternity dress I never liked.  
I did wear it though – for my birthday celebration in week 39 – the day before delivery.
week 30

IMG_9766A printed A-line dress I wore to several parties and occasions both during and before pregnancy.
week 39

IMG_9771A green form fitting jersey dress, I’ve never had the courage to wear before, but with a bump this big I figured no one would notice my other “bumps” and “humps”…
week 39 (two days before delivery)

Although not as much as I initially planed, I did work out some during my pregnancy. And when it came to clothes for bicycling, power walks and weight lifting I just used my regular fitness clothes – Pants worn beneath the belly, long stretch tops and jackets/west worn open.
IMG_20160305_110924_resizedweek 27

image000002_resizedweek 38

In the end my favorite clothes during my pregnancy was a slim black dress, a long tank top and a printed kimono/caftan, all worn with a narrow belt beneath the bust – non of which was new or made for a pregnant body.
IMG_2196
Slim black dress accessorized with belt, huge jewelry and gold bag.
week 30

IMG_0109_resizedAt my “goodby-party” at work, wearing flowery kimono, tank top and shorts.
week 38

IMG_20160515_194543_resizedweek 37

*In Sweden we count pregnancy in 40 weeks (with 40 full weeks as the calculated day of birth, and full term at 38-42 weeks).
I had my baby at 39 weeks and 2 days.

Historic Pregnancy Wear

As my urge to sew slowly seep back into my body, I find myself looking at another type of fashions then before – namely maternety dresses through history.

Even though I probably never will get the time to sew, and even les to wear them – here are some of the beauties I´ve found.

images(Yes I know, its comonly said that this weeding portrait comes without childbearing gifts, but you got to agree with me´- eiter that´s a lot of cokies, padding or she´s been honoring those wedding vovs for quite a while…)
I would love to wear something simular to the medieval fair late may – if i have the strenght to go.

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images (2)

99f0c1525ae4f83fae85088048e9ee90Dreamy – and would work both with and without a baby bump

9de3f7012bf0ce950d7e39a712d96cb8

85a28660aa8d8cff313d2d7c2ac03aac

tumblr_m0qnmbmEJC1qbkn6io1_500Ok, not the most comfortable thing to wear, but it do looks good.

ladda ned

Austria2This “I only button the top”thing, works just as well in the 16th century as it does today with knit cardigans.

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Images of pregnancy maternity fashion - 17th 18th 19th century maternity style

c511f98c3f2bfec60ee6b59a5b7e8e4b“Lets just hide everything” is a look that only works for paintings – and instagram photos…

e41650fe9563b5e298d85009fdd7c5f0

tumblr_m13h8vq1Mm1qbkn6io1_500

969e4d687c637f87c23984dee3539077Not sure if I´m most facinated by the womans figure or the mans outfit…

Do you have any favourite pictures of maternity wear?

Past Brown Creations

This months theme for HSM/15 is “Brown”.

The Dreamstress whites:
it’s not the most exciting colour by modern standards, but brown has been one of the most common, and popular, colours throughout history. Make something brown.

I actually like brown.
It’s a great color that (in my opinion) accentuates almost any other color. Its softer then black and cooler then white when making color combinations. Brown also comes in a lot of different shades from dark chocolate to golden and soft nougat. It’s also been a (more or les=) popular color throughout history.

Here are some of my brown pieces I’ve added t my historical wardrobe theses past years:

IMG_1375One of my favorite dresses is this 1780s robe a la Anglaise in a lovely flowery cotton matched with a golden petticoat and brown stockings.

IMG_02181850s lend itself great to the brown color pallet.
This walking dress in printed cotton makes an impact on everyone around.

IMG_0406The dress also comes with an evening bodice.

IMG_2004A photo from 1929 inspired this simple cotton dress, the brown boots and white collar ads perfectly to the authenticity.

IMG_5660Who knew a 1880s evening gown in brown could be so glamours. The light teal skirt, white gloves and the dark brown fringe perfectly sets of the nougat in the gown.

IMG_0657The same 1880s trained bodice, paired with leather pants and heavy duty boots, also works for a softer Steampunk style.

IMG_8728Simple rural 18th century woolen bodice in light nougat/dark beige perfectly matches the plaid in the skirt and the softness in the nature all around.

IMG_1115-ok18th century menswear in a wide spectrum of brown hues, with the coat as the obvious focal point, matched with golden/brown waistcoat and beige/brown suede breeches.

IMG_6202A simple white shirt made fabulous with the help of a nice brown 1990s woolen skirt and cola colored belt.

IMG_4587This dark chocolate 18th century skirt reads as black, but makes a softer contrast to the white apron and stockings then black. The bodice is actually yellow with purple stripes, but can very well be read as brown.

IMG_3444Dark wine paired with chocolate brown makes for a serene medieval picture.

DSC_0776Golden poly knit makes for a nice Egyptian masquerade costume.

I’ve also made several accessories to my costumes:
IMG_5188Brown fake fur hat, matched with bought fake fur muff and fox stole, worn with my 1900s walking outfit.

IMG_8039A 1660s (or any period really) fake fur stole/shawl.

IMG_1106Chocolate velvet sleeveless spencer, made to go with my yellow regency gown.

IMG_4160Velvet cape trimmed with fake fur and 1840s velvet bonnet, make for some pretty Dickensien winter picture..

pump-ståSometimes the simplest of items make a huge different, This 1550s outfit wouldn’t be complete without the brown apron.

What do you think of the color brown?