Edwardian Vampire

Here comes another batch from last years Halloween photoshoot.

This time we are doing the classical vampire in my Edwardian lingere getup.

interviewtomInspiration 1.
Sadly I couldn’t get anyone to play Lestat, so we had to manage on our own 🙂

vampire02Inspiration 2.

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img_9449Model: Jessie Lewis Skoglund
Photo: Elin Evaldsdotter
Costume & Concept: Fashion through History

1900s Autumn Suit – Photoshoot

To get some photos of my new Edwardian wool dress, I took the opportunity to use my fiancees workplace as settings and my sister as photograph.

I’m wearing: The brown/plaid wool skirt, lacy shirtwaist, wool bolero and my Titanic hat (with a quick fix-up) Underneath I have my S-shaped corset, petticoat, chemise, corset cover, stockings and black “American Duchess” Gibson shoes.

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IMG_9011Photo: Maria Petersson

1900s Brown Bolero Jacket

The night before the photoshoot of my new Edwardian shirtwaist and skirt, I decided I also needed a jacket
(I know – Crazy!).

So while adding buttons to the blouse, I also drafted a quick pattern from “The Edwardian Modiste” by Frances Grimble, which I’ve been eyeing for quite a while.
20150915_074642_resizedSuch a cute jacket/bolero.
Then I grabbed a piece of soft wool, which of course matched the beige in the plaid skirt perfectly, from my stash and begun cutting and sewing.

It all went so fast and within, half an hour I had a functional bolero.

Then all I needed to do was to hem the sleeves and bodice and to decorate it.
I altered between some dark pom-pom trim and the simpler soutage ribbon in soft nougat. The later won the fight, and my only regret is that I didn’t had enough to also trim the sleeves.

IMG_8882The bolero from the inside – all edges left raw.

I also added a hook and bar to wear it close if I want to.

The finished bolero:
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Just the facts:

Challenge: HSM/15 nr 9 – Brown

What: a 1900s bolero jacket

Pattern: I drafted my own using “The Edwardian Modiste” by Frances Grimble as a guide (basically a front + back bodice and a wide sleeve cut apart at the top)

Fabric & Notions: 0.5 of soft light brown wool, thread, hook and eye and 2 m soutage ribbon for decoration.

Time: 3 hours! Such a fun and quick project.

Cost: 45 Sek (6 Usd) – a leftover scrap, to small for anything really, I bought on sale a year ago.

How historical accurate: Not sure. The pattern is based on a actual pattern, but I might have modernized both it and the construction techniques. The internal seams are machined and all the finishing are done by hand – like in the period. The fabric is plausible and the silhouette are about right so I would guess about 7/10.

Final Thoughts: I love it so much! I could wear it to the office right now (I might have to reduce the sleeves a bit first though). The fabrics so soft and the shape is just lovely. The only thing i ca think of that’s not perfect is that I didn’t considered the stiffness of the wool when drafting the sleeves – thous making them a bit to wide. They will probably look better in a more drapery fabric.
I might also add some more trim later on when I find something I like.

The whole outfit:
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And since you always need something on your head I draped some leftover fabric on an modern straw hat, to get that big Edwardian hat shape.IMG_8884

Next up: The photoshoot

1900s Lacy Shirtwaist

To have something to wear with my new plaid 1900s skirt, I wanted to make a new shirtwaist (I do love my old one but sometimes (ok, always) you want something new).

And in my stash I found this lovely pattern from “Wearing History” which I bought half a year ago when she had a Sale, and I’ve been dying to try it out.

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As the pattern comes as a “print at home” version, the first thing I needed to do was to cut and assemble the pieces. 20150913_114431_resized

Not sure what fabric to use, I searched through my stash and found the last piece of white striped cotton voile (from which I’ve previously made: A Chemise a la Rein, a 1900s pigeon front dress and a 1850s working woman’s shirt/waist), and a newly required of white cotton lace decorated in lovely flowers.
2013-05-29 17.38.05  Unfortunately I hadn’t enough lace to cover the whole shirt – I could either use it on the bodice and make short sleeves, or I could use it to make long/full sleeves and ad a bit of lace around the collar and shoulders.
After some thinking and experimenting with the pattern layout I decided to go with the full sleeves and then try to get as much of the upper bodice out of it as possible.IMG_8785

I realized pretty soon the lace was way to fragile and “open” for the garment I wanted to make. So I dug out some ivory chiffon from my stash and used it to back all the lacy pieces.IMG_8784
The result was perfect. The sleeves kept their lightness, while the see-thoroughness was dampened and strengthened all at the same time.

I stitched most of the blouse on machine, but all the work with the lace needed to be made by hand.

Unfortunately I’ve been really bad at taking pictures lately but besides from the fiddling to get the lace right, the construction is pretty simple.

Before finishing I did needed to make a decision about how to  end the lace on the bodice.
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I could either cut it to the neckline and trim it with lace edgings, or I could save as much as possible of the lace and trim the bottom edge across the back and bust.

In the end I opted for the later, thinking I could always go back and change it at a later date if I want to.

To get that nice pigeon “breast effect” I used bias-tape and a cotton cord to gather the waist.IMG_8862The inside of the blouse.

I made a combination of buttons, buttonholes and metal snaps for the back clouser. IMG_8860

The finished Blouse:
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IMG_8854The facts:

What: A 1905s shirtwaist

Pattern: “Wearing history” 1900s shirtwaist pattern

Fabric: 1 m of striped cotton voile, 0,5 m of cotton lace, 0,5 m of cotton lining for the bodice and 0,3 m of polyester chiffon for backing of the lace.

Notions: Thread, Buttonhole-thread, bias-tape, cotton cord, 10 cm plastic boning, 13 buttons, 7 snaps.

Time: 10-15 hours.

Cost: 400 Sek if everything been bought new, but since everything came from stash and most of the fabrics was leftovers I wouldn’t say even half.

Final thought: I loved working with this pattern, and I have only myself to blame for not making a mock-up since i had a bit trouble getting the collar to fit properly. And I maybe should have skipped out on adding the second layer cotton to the bodice – It may have looked a bit nicer and softer. I also may have to reset the sleeves without the pleats at the shoulders.
But all in all, I’m pretty pleased with the blouse.

Worn with the skirt:
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And a preview from the photoshoot:
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1900s Brown Plaid Skirt

As soon as I laid eyes on this fashion plate I knew I wanted it
(and of course the costume ;-))0aa238a070b160e1062e58eda9df1551

Jen at Festive Attyre made the most fabulous recreation of it a while back.auto4And even though I knew I could never match her skill or perfect Edwardian look, I really wanted a similar look.

So when the HSM challenge 9 – “Brown” approached I scouted out my stash for the perfect brown and plaid wool fabric, and got to work.
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I drafted the pattern using Nora Waughs “The cut of women’s clothes”
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I cut the pieces on the bias, carefully matched the plaid to meet at an angel at the seams.
IMG_8788 IMG_8790Matching the plaid

I used some white cotton for the foundation and stitched bias-tape to make boning channels to get that nice body-hugging look of the corseted skirt of this era.
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The skirt closes at the front with hooks and eyes, over a placket and secured with another pair of bones.
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I finished by hemming the skirt using a 10 cm wide strip of beige cotton for hem-facing.
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And that’s it.IMG_8823The skirt from the inside

The finished Skirt:
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Just the facts:

Challenge: HSM15 nr 9 – Brown

What: A 1900s brown/plaid walking skirt.

Pattern: I drafted my own using Nora Waugh’s “The cut of women’s clothes”

Fabric: 3 m of plaid wool an bits and scraps of cotton for interlining and hem-facing.

Notions: Thread, 2 m of bias-tape, 2m of boning, and hooks and eyes for clouser.

Time: About 10 hours – the fabric matching and hand stitched hem took more time then usual.

Cost: About 200 Sek (32Usd) – all material came from stash but I bought this fabric on sale about a year a ago with a similar project in mind.

How historical accurate: Pretty good. The fabric and pattern are all good. Even though most of the skirt is made by machine the finishing are hand-stitched, as it should be fr this period. I did use some modern techniques on the foundation piece. I’d give it a 7/10.

First worn: Will be worn for photos on October 4th.

Final thoughts: I like how it came out, both the sweep of the skirt and the pattern matching looks really nice, but I’m not completely happy with the raised waistline and I might go back to tweak it a bit later on. But a ll in all it’s a nice piece to have in the costume wardrobe.

 

Edwardian Sisters

I love attending events with my sister/sisters.
It’s so great having a companion in this crazy costuming adventure.
Someone who love dressing up as much as me, and who gets the work and planing goes into making an historical outfit with all it’s accessories and seemingly uncomfortable pieces (non les putting it on).

IMG_6179So when she discovered she was free from work, and thous able to go to the 18th century “fika” in old town, I was so happy and immediately scrambled to find something for her to wear (because that’s what sisters do)

And since I was to wear Edwardian we decided that so should she.

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The day of the event I arrived at her house, carrying both our costumes, in good time to get ourselfs ready.20150315_142515underwear selfie

We helped each-other lazing the corsets and button those buttons, and then we were of (only half an hour to late, ops).
I blame my sisters hair for taking to much time, but really, it just take a lot of time getting into all those layers.

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Gibson hairstyle

After saying our goodbyes to the others, we stopped for some quick photos of our costumes.
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Sis is wearing the newly made walking skirt, a modern blouse, over my 1880s corset and combined with a modern belt and a ribbon for necktie.IMG_6202

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I’m wearing my suffraget skirt, modern jacket, Edwardian blouse, 1900s corset and several accessories like a fur hat, modern fur shawl, elbow length opera glows, my black swiss-waist and an 1950s embroidered bag.IMG_6218

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IMG_20150315_181820Edwardian Selfie