(HSM 12/2017) A fur trimmed Burgundy Burgundian Gown – Photoshoot

Once my Burgundian gown (finally) was finished, I decided to take some nice wintery photos of it.
But since being pregnant (and feeling “fat – not yet baby belly”) and constantly tired, combined with the planing it takes to get these shoots together, had the snow melted by the time.

The good thing about this dress is that even though I did’n know about the coming baby when I started the gown (last fall) there was no problem what so ever, of fitting in it ūüôā
We even got some nice “maternity” photos.

photo: Elin Evaldsdotter

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(HSM 12/2017) A fur trimmed Burgundy Burgundian Gown

This gown been long over due (originally planed to enter it to the HSM 2017 nr 12), and since starting it (in early september 2017) I had some serious down time in energy and sewing time.

But this spring I decided I really wanted it finished and of the UFO-pile, so here it is.

Ever since I made my sister her Burgundian gown, I knew I wanted one of my own, so when the challenge “Animal” came my way through the “Historical sew Monthly 2017”, I immediately started plotting my gown.

I used a Burgundy (dark-red/brownish) colored cotton satin, that I got for a steal on a fabric sale about a year ago.

The 5 m I had, was just enough to piece out dress and additional skirt gores.

Since this was to be a quick and “un-necessary” project, made in a not historical accurate fabric I decided to stitch it all on my sewing-machine.

So that’s what I did, overlocking the edges and everything.

I think I spent the whole of 1 hour stitching it together, adding the sleeves and asking my boyfriend to mark the hem.

But then I got stuck – on the fur trimings.

After some searching, both for inspirational pictures and in the fabric stores, I decided on a dark brown faux “wolf” fur, that would work nice with the red and browns in the gown.

But by the time I got the fur into my sewing-room, I realized it would take some serious planing to get it done.
Having a 1,5 year old kid around meant I needed to find at least a couple of hours of¬† un-interrupted sewing/cutting time…
Yeah, good luck with that.

So there I was, trying to find both the energy, inspiration and time to finish the dress.
Neddles to say the gown went into my UFO pile for a few months.

I dug it out to finish only this past weeks, so that I could wear it on a dance recital late april.
The dance recital didn’t happened, but the dress got finished, so I count it a win anyway.

Against my better judgement I decided to cut the fur like it was a regular fabric – which it clearly is not!
I spent a few hours cursing my lazy as for not bothering to cut the pieces one by one from the backside of the fabric (like I should have), thous ending up with hairs and fur bits EVERYWHERE.Can you say – werewolf ūüėČ

Attaching the fur went pretty easy, only the fur was so thick I had a bit trouble seeing my needle when I hand stitched it on.There is a needle attached to that tread, I promise…

The work payed of, and the effect of the dark fur against the burgundy of the gown is striking.

Testing the almost finished gown to see how it looks.

I’m so happy I stuck to it, and managed to finish it, even though I will probably find fury bits in my sewing-room (and the rest of our apartment) for a few years time…Finally finished

Finished Pictures:

The facts:

What: a 1450s Medieval “Burgundian” gown.

Pattern: Self drafted based on pattern from “The Medieval Tailor assistant”

Fabric: 5 m of cotton sateen and 2 m of faux fur

Notion: Thread

Time: 10 hours (of sewing time)

Cost: About 50 Sek for the fabric and 200 Sek for the fur so about 20Usd total.

Final thoughts: I really like this type of gown. It looks so elegant and beautiful, and since it doesn’t require any particular fitting I can wear it both with and without the baby bump.
Dressed and ready for some photos.

S√∂derk√∂ping’s Medieval Fair 2015

This weekend it was once again time for the annual medieval fair called “S√∂derk√∂pings G√§stabud”.
And just like last year I talked my sister into going with me, to watch and help with the dance recital.

And of course she needed something to wear…
So after a week of intensive sewing we were finally ready for the fair.

20150829_134702_resizedSis and me in our Medieval garb:
Blue Burgundian (24 hour) dress, and green wool cotiehardie. 

Once at Söderköping we hurried to find the rest of the dance team to get some last minute practice before we were to perform.  IMG_8308

My sister also got to partake in the dancing (even though she only watched the performance once before, (a task she performed perfectly, of course).IMG_8307OMG – how I’m I to keep my hats on while dancing?”

IMG_8314Medieval dancing…

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IMG_8311Othilia and Maria (sis) catches their breath after the performance.

Since we then had a 3 hour break until next dance-performance, me, Clara and Maria headed of on our own.  IMG_8330

¬†First stop, “Jofotex fabrics” – the by far best fabric store in our area.IMG_8327“Price¬†the lords for fabrics”

You could clearly see the influence the Medieval fair had on the store (and the well dressed clientele), with special prices on wool, linens, and everything slightly medieval. And the staff didn’t even bug an eye at our walking in in costumes.
IMG_8319A¬†for effort but some¬†what¬†lower scores for historical accuracy…

Once again out of the store, somewhat poorer, (I bought some lovely ivory lace and fabric for a new skirt to my 17th century bodice) we headed back to the market to see everything. We found:

Knights practicing their fencing.IMG_8334

IMG_8337Maria and Clara listening to lovely music. 

Knights and horses.IMG_8341

And a coffin…IMG_8346

IMG_8348The town of Söderköping really is the perfect place for this kind of events, with the rivers, cobblestones and old houses it looks so beautiful.IMG_8351

I managed to get some pic of the new gown:IMG_8354

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The market place lay beside the old church in the middle of the city.IMG_8374

There was lots of great things to shop for any historic/fabric nerd:IMG_8367Natural Furs

IMG_8370Colored furs – note the leopard and zebra colored ones.

IMG_8369Ribbon bonanza

IMG_8372Linen fabrics

IMG_8368Silk and velvet

IMG_8371And of course rows and rows of lovely wool.

Then we returned to the place for or next dance performance just in time to enjoy a great band playing medieval music.IMG_8376

IMG_8377Karin and Dan relaxing in the grass enjoying the music.

IMG_8381Sis in a sea of dress.

I didn’t get any pics of the dancing itself (since both me and my photographer was dancing), but it went really well and we had lots of folks looking and clapping.

Afterwards we had some final chat before it was time to say goodbye for this time.IMG_8386

IMG_8383The musicians Lena and Eric and dance master Sievert.

IMG_8387Maud and Othilia having a cozy moment.

IMG_8392Karin and Solveig both looking great in their dresses and headwear.

IMG_8397And that’s all folks…

(24 hours) Burgundian Medieval Gown

Last Saturday evening I came to chat with my sister about the upcoming Medieval fair, where I was to have a dance performance this weekend.
I asked if she wanted to come along, and since she doesn’t have any medieval clothes, if I should try to make her some…

Of course she wanted –¬†So said and done.

I made a quick calculation of how much time I would have for this project – with deadline in 6 days wear of 5 was workdays and the only whole day was Sunday – where all the fabric stores are closed. And no I didn’t had anything suitable in my stash.
This was going to be a though one, but I knew that with some planing (and boyfriend away at work most of the nights) I could do this.

And this is how it went:

Saturday evening/night:
I sent her some picks of various medieval gowns that would be easy to make even without to much time and fittings.
She selected a model – The 15th century Burgundian dress, and sent me her measurements.
20150822_211254_resizedPicture from “The Medieval Tailor Assistant”

20150823_100221_resizedMy quick sketch including calculations on time, fabric and money.

(Consultation = 1 hour)

Sunday morning:
I drafted the pattern for the dress based on “The Medieval Tailor Assistant” and her measurements.
Then I cut and made a mock-up.
I also drafted and made a pattern test for the typical Burgundian “flower pot” headwear.¬†20150823_131154_resizedI tried the mock-up on myself to see if there was any obvious problems.

(Pattern (1) & Mock-up (1,5) = 2,5 hours)

Monday:
I meet with my sister after work to try the mock-up – which fitted her really good.
Just some minor alterations like shortening the sleeves, raising the under arm seam and ad more width to the skirt and it would be perfect.

Then we went to the store to pick out her fabric.
Due to lack of both time and funds we decided on some cheaper cotton twill in a lovely teal blue color, combined with purple for the stomacher and white fake fur collar – from my stash.
The dress should probably be made in lovely thin wool or heavy silk brocade to look it’s very best, but I’m convinced no one will notice our small budget, and if it men the dress is done in time and looks nice I think it’s the best choice to make.
IMG_8230the selected fabric

Once home again I immediately started to pin the pattern to the fabric for the cutting.
IMG_8227measuring the biggest possible size of the gores

Then I begun the daunting task of pinning all the (huge) pieces together.IMG_8232The back pieces pinned together.

And finished the night by hand sewing the base of the Burgundian Hening in front of the TV.
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(Fitting (0,5) + Fabric shopping (1) + Cutting (1) + pinning/sewing (2) = 5 hours)

Tuesday:
When I got home from work on Thursday I immediately started to sew the dress together, pinning and pressing as I went.
The time flied and by the end of the night I had a pretty decent looking dress (thank good for sewing machines and sergers)
IMG_8248The basic dress stitched together

Once the night fell I once more seated myself in my favorite couch to put some more work into the hat.
Adding bias-tape round the edges and covering it with glued on batting.
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(Sewing dress together (2) + Hat (2) = 4 hours)

Wednesday:
On Wednesday I focused on getting the collar done to get the dress as finished as possible for the final fitting on Thursday.
I sewed the collar to the neckline and carefully pinned the fur pieces on top, attaching the by hand.
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Then I finished the cuffs and attached the sleeves.
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I also started covering the hat with black fake silk.

(collar (2) + hat (1) = 3 hours)

Thursday:
I meet with my sister once more to try the almost finished dress, and to determent the length of the skirt.
20150827_180344(0)_resized 20150827_180319_resizedI love the look of this whole outfit

Once my sister left, I got to work on cutting the hem.
I really wanted to make it by hand, but time was running out and I still had the head-dress to finish so I took the easy (fast) way out and machine stitched it.

(Fitting (0,5) + hemming (0,5) + hat (2) = 4 hours)

Friday:
With the dress finished I got to work on the hat, adding the front “loop” and the lining. I finished by attaching a sheer veil (my 18th century fichu) at the top.

The I steamed the whole outfit, and put it on my dress-form for some nice pictures “finished”.

(Finishing = 3 Hours)

Saturday:
I re-pressed and packed all her garments, dressed in my cotiehardie and traveled to the fair Рleaving home 08.00 pm.
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More Pics from the Event and photoshoot is in the works.

(pressing, packing and dressing = 0,5 hours)

(Summary: 1 + 2,5 + 5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 0.5 = 24 hours)

The Finished Hat:
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The Finished Dress:
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The facts:

What: a 15th century Burgundian gown and hat.

Pattern: I drafted my own using “The Medieval Tailor Assistant” as a guide and my modern bodice templates as a base.
For the hat I refereed to lots of picture sources online this being the main one.

Fabric & Notions: 4 m of teal cotton twill, 0,3m purple cotton twill for the stomacher, 0,3m white fake fur, and thread.
For the hat I used 0,3m black fake silk, 0,3m buckram, pieces of batting, cotton scraps for lining, 0,5m polyester chiffon for the veil (I used my 18th century fichu), 1m of millinery wire and thread.

Time: 24 hours including fittings and millinery-work.

Cost: About 300Sek (48usd) although some of teh material came from my stash so we didn’t pay that much up front.

Final thoughts: I’m so happy with how it came out, And I think my sister also loves it – at least she looked quite happy and confident at the event yesterday…
The only thing that may need some fixing is to lengthen the sleeves about 1 cm, which I in my hurry to finish cut to short – ops.
But the worst thing is – Now I have to buy some nice wool (or brocade silk, oh my) to make myself one of these gowns….

Medieval dress in a day

Ok, I must admit it did take me a bit longer then one day.¬†But if I would have had one whole day (morning to evening) and not 3 short evenings to make it, I’m sure I would have finished to.

With less then one week left to the Medieval Feast my sister decided she wanted to go to. So we started bouncing dress ideas (while being at work/school) and decided the style of the dress on thuesday, while bying fabric.

Even though the dress was to be made by machine, with only the eyelets worked by hand, I’ve been to busy sewing to take any “in progress photos”. Sorry…

But I do have finished photos, and this is how it turned out.

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Made out of burgundy and brown cotton twill.

The eyelets on the front and sleeves are all worked by hand, and closes with a syntetic cord.

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My sister really liked the dress and looked totaly great in it.

The day after the party we went to the cathedral near by to take some pictures.

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My Green Medieval dress – photos

The day after the Medieval Feast me and my sister went outside to shoot some pictures of our dresses. And since the medieval clothes feels and looks best in religous and grand settings, we walked the 500m to the city Chatehdral.

I wore my new green dress, the whimple, the braids and velvet cape.

IMG_3684This beautiful “Mary and child” statue sits right outside the museum.

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The Chathedral of Linköping is a beautiful building finished in the 1490s, and restorated and added to since.IMG_3343

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IMG_3663Not exactly the right footwear…

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IMG_3546But what happened here?

I do think the Gothic building style come into fashion a bit sudden…

A Green Medieval Cote

My entry for the HSF challenge 21: Green, is a medieval dress called a Cotiehardie. Its a outer gown which is ment to be worn over a kirtle and a chemise.

medieval4My inspiration pic.

I used the “Medieval Tailor’s Assistant” as a guide, and did my patten from the basic pattern block,¬†and toile I’ve previously made¬†from the book.

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IMG_2766I used a thick green woolen fabric, and cut and basted the dress together for a fitting.

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I needed to adjust the sleeve and neck a bit. So I took it apart and made the alterations.

IMG_2738Then I started the time consuming task of working about 30 button-holes.

IMG_2740I’ve already compleated the buttons in advance and sewed them on the outer edge of the right front piece.

IMG_2745I’ve used some cotton leftover as facing in the neck and as a buttonhole stand.

Then¬†I sewed the rest of the dress together –¬†did the gores, side seams and sewed¬†on the sleeves.

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 21 – Green

What: A medieval cotehardie.

Year: 1350 -1400.

Pattern: Drafted my own based on the “Cotehardie” pattern from “The Medieval Tailor’s Assistant”.

Fabric: 3m of green wool and some cotton scraps.

Notions: Thread and buttonhole thread.

How historical accurate: Pretty good. The dress is compleatly hand sewn, with historical methodes. I do however think the fabric is a bit thick for this type of dress. 7/10

Time: About 30 hours

Cost: 400 sek (44 Usd)

First worn: Not yet, but will be on the Medieval dinner party my dance group is hosting on 9th of nov.