A Pink Caraco Gift

When the HSF challenge 3- Pink, was announced in december I was more then sceptical. I am certainly not a fan of pink, I wouldn’t even think of wearing it.

But a challenge is a challenge…

And I decided to face my fears (not a fear really, more of a huge distaste) and do the challenge – and do it all the way.

So searcing my stash for something pinkish (yeah right, good luck) I actually came up with two workable fabric options. One pale pink cotton sheet, and a couple of metres of pink/white checkered linnen curtains – both fabric’s been given to me at some point.

Still not sure of what to make, thinking about something regency, 18th century or early 20th century, I decided to wait until the big opera gown was finished, in late januray, to decide.

Perhaps it was faith, since I found the most wounderful fabric at an internet auction 2 weeks ago.180551824_21ee55d7-97ff-4039-a871-e3a62da1ef96 I emedetly know I needed that fabric. So I bidded on it and won. And a week ago it arrived.

Despite the fact the amount of fabic was really limited (only 1m), I decided to try to get a 18th century Caraco jacket out of it.

But since I’t will need to be a fairly smal jacket, I decided to make the jacket as a “thank you” gift to sister M. She is always so nice and wounderful and helps me with my projects, and without complaining photographs my costumes out in the freezing snow. Thank you so much for everything!

I’m thinking something like this.274015958547564766_VevBYigl_f

So I put my sisters corset on my dressform and started to drape the pattern.

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Then I used a good hour trying to get the pieces out, getting the print in the exact way I wanted.IMG_6077

I sewed it togehter using modern sewing methods.IMG_6118

Snipping the allowence to keep the curved edges nice and smooth.IMG_6120

I put the bodice back on the dressform to get a feeling for how it would look.

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Pretty nice, and I particulary like the birds placements on the back.IMG_6125

I pleated the trim which I cut from the fabric edges.IMG_6082

Then I needed to decide on how to place it. Playing around with it, I came up with 5 alternatives.

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IMG_6137I think I like this one the best (let’s just hope my sister like it aswell).

Then I put in the sleevesIMG_6144

Getting all the seam-allownces between the layers.IMG_6145

When I started to pin on the trim, I discovered something strange…IMG_6150…A hint: You will have to keep your hands behind your back…

So I ripped the sleeves out (all four of them) and switched the sides. But the result was the same, only worse. So for the second time in on hour, I ripped the sleeves out. Grrr. IMG_6152I gave up the idea of a nice finished inside, and basted the lining and the outer fabric together. And stiched the sleeves in one last time (after pinning it in on the dressform).

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Then I pinned and hand-stiched on the trim. I used the hooks and thread eyes to lock the light bones on the outer edge of the front.

Finished:IMG_6154

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Just the Facts:

Challenge: Nr 3 – Pink.

What: A 1770s caraco jacket.

Pattern: Draped my own using Janet Arnolds “Patterns of Fashion”.

Fabric: 1 m of printed pink qvilting cotton, 1 m of white cotton sheet.

Notion: Thread, 8 hooks and 0,6m of syntetic whale bone.

How Historical Accurate: Not at all. The general look of it is plausable, but the fabric, the print and the construction methods are all wrong and modern. But to be fair – this project was never meant to be accurate.

Time: 12 hours.

Cost: 100 Sek (16 Usd).

First Worn: Not yet (I’m not even sure it will fit her).

Final Thoughts: I like the jacket and would gladly wear it if it would have fit me. Hopefully my sister will like it as much as I do…

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5 thoughts on “A Pink Caraco Gift

  1. Pingback: Progress Report: Caraco Jacket | Lady Fancyson's Fripperies

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