(HSM 12/2017) A fur trimmed Burgundy Burgundian Gown – Photoshoot

Once my Burgundian gown (finally) was finished, I decided to take some nice wintery photos of it.
But since being pregnant (and feeling “fat – not yet baby belly”) and constantly tired, combined with the planing it takes to get these shoots together, had the snow melted by the time.

The good thing about this dress is that even though I did’n know about the coming baby when I started the gown (last fall) there was no problem what so ever, of fitting in it ūüôā
We even got some nice “maternity” photos.

photo: Elin Evaldsdotter

(HSM 12/2017) A fur trimmed Burgundy Burgundian Gown

This gown been long over due (originally planed to enter it to the HSM 2017 nr 12), and since starting it (in early september 2017) I had some serious down time in energy and sewing time.

But this spring I decided I really wanted it finished and of the UFO-pile, so here it is.

Ever since I made my sister her Burgundian gown, I knew I wanted one of my own, so when the challenge “Animal” came my way through the “Historical sew Monthly 2017”, I immediately started plotting my gown.

I used a Burgundy (dark-red/brownish) colored cotton satin, that I got for a steal on a fabric sale about a year ago.

The 5 m I had, was just enough to piece out dress and additional skirt gores.

Since this was to be a quick and “un-necessary” project, made in a not historical accurate fabric I decided to stitch it all on my sewing-machine.

So that’s what I did, overlocking the edges and everything.

I think I spent the whole of 1 hour stitching it together, adding the sleeves and asking my boyfriend to mark the hem.

But then I got stuck – on the fur trimings.

After some searching, both for inspirational pictures and in the fabric stores, I decided on a dark brown faux “wolf” fur, that would work nice with the red and browns in the gown.

But by the time I got the fur into my sewing-room, I realized it would take some serious planing to get it done.
Having a 1,5 year old kid around meant I needed to find at least a couple of hours of¬† un-interrupted sewing/cutting time…
Yeah, good luck with that.

So there I was, trying to find both the energy, inspiration and time to finish the dress.
Neddles to say the gown went into my UFO pile for a few months.

I dug it out to finish only this past weeks, so that I could wear it on a dance recital late april.
The dance recital didn’t happened, but the dress got finished, so I count it a win anyway.

Against my better judgement I decided to cut the fur like it was a regular fabric – which it clearly is not!
I spent a few hours cursing my lazy as for not bothering to cut the pieces one by one from the backside of the fabric (like I should have), thous ending up with hairs and fur bits EVERYWHERE.Can you say – werewolf ūüėČ

Attaching the fur went pretty easy, only the fur was so thick I had a bit trouble seeing my needle when I hand stitched it on.There is a needle attached to that tread, I promise…

The work payed of, and the effect of the dark fur against the burgundy of the gown is striking.

Testing the almost finished gown to see how it looks.

I’m so happy I stuck to it, and managed to finish it, even though I will probably find fury bits in my sewing-room (and the rest of our apartment) for a few years time…Finally finished

Finished Pictures:

The facts:

What: a 1450s Medieval “Burgundian” gown.

Pattern: Self drafted based on pattern from “The Medieval Tailor assistant”

Fabric: 5 m of cotton sateen and 2 m of faux fur

Notion: Thread

Time: 10 hours (of sewing time)

Cost: About 50 Sek for the fabric and 200 Sek for the fur so about 20Usd total.

Final thoughts: I really like this type of gown. It looks so elegant and beautiful, and since it doesn’t require any particular fitting I can wear it both with and without the baby bump.
Dressed and ready for some photos.

S√∂derk√∂pings Medieval Fair 2017

It’s almost been a month since the yearly Medieval fair in S√∂derk√∂ping, and I just now gotten round to post about it, but better late then never right:-).

I’ve been attending this fair with my sister for a few years now (2014, 2015, 2016) and this year was no exception, only this year I didn’t joined the dance recital, but instead had my hand full taking care of my 1 year old son.

As always I had a bit of a trouble deciding on what to wear, but finally settled on the Elizabeth I dress l made last year.

My sister borrowed my red renaissance kirtle.

And baby Charlie wore the Henry VIII coat from last year, pared with an old red velvet hat to match.

I promised my fianc√© I wouldn’t dress him to weird, and in my defence I can only say I (partially) held that promise.¬†Besides from the coat and hat (which he needed for head covering), he wears a regular gray long sleeved t-shirt and pants pared with his autumn boots.¬†

*Disclaimer: This post will be full of cute (faceless) “Henry VII” baby pics – so consider yourself warned;-)

**I’m sorry about the “Floating ruff”, but the partlet was simply to hot to wear, and I’ve forgotten to bring my necklace and/or black-worked smock, so I figured it was better then nothing… :-/

We begun the day by touring the market place.
And I got a beautiful feather fan, and a book about medieval clothing that I’ve never seen before.

Then we walked the 500m or so to the camp and Medieval playground.
¬†There was a lot of “follow the toddler” happening.

Then we meet up with the dancing team and baby C got introduced to the whole gang for te first time.

My sister joined the dancing

And me and C watched(At least for a little while), then he was of agin…¬†I do think we made for quite a sight.
Lots of people commented on how cute he looked, and some even wanted our picture.

After the dancing we went to get some food, and encountered the knights on our way to the restaurant.After lunch we stopped to take a break and to play a bit in the parks playground.  The slide is by far his favourite.
The we did even more exploring the townHa ha, I love that my sister tries to play with him and how he’s much more interesting in the gravel:-D ¬†Trying to get some nice photos together…¬†It’s harder then you’d think
Before we headed home we took another round of the market and listened to some music,¬†Met a knight of the crusades¬† and looked at some more pretty things (that we didn’t buy). Renaissance ladies.
¬†It was such a fun day, and a perfect “first event” for C (who was in the best of moods during the day, and then slept the whole car ride home). What more could you wish for ūüôā

Shirts for a Gentleman

Last fall, right before I hit the wall sewing wise I’d taken on one of my rare commissions (I don’t usually sew for others unless its totally on my terms).
But when my wonderful dancing master Sievert asked me if I could help him update his historical shirts I couldn’t say no.

He needed both a new medieval and a new regency shirt to use on our dance recitals.

So I got some nice cotton (I know linnen would be more accurate but I was to make them on machine anyway. And they needed to be easy to wash and care for), made some quick pattern calculations and cut the rectangles needed for both the shirts.

Then I stopped, put my head in the sand and closed my eyes to everything sewing/historical (because pregnancy can do that to you)

More then 10 months later (after the birth of my son, and then some), I was once more ready to tackle the shamefully late commission.

So after one intense week of sewing in between feedings, I managed to sew and deliver both shirts.img_0882

The process went pretty fast and straight forward except one little hiccup –
While putting the last hand on and pressing the Medievals shirt I noticed the seam allowance on the outside on one of the sleeves.

Meaning i’ve put it in inside out.

Crap!

So it was on to un-picking the french felled seam (with hand finishing:-( )
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I then turned the sleeve outside- in and re-attached it, pressed and once more used tiny hand stitches to fell the seam.

There done!

Or, wait a second…

NOOOOoooo!!!

I done the exact same mistake AGAIN!

Some of you might remember that I’ve done this before (on my Borgia chemise les then a month before).

How is it¬†even possible that I didn’t learn?
By now I tossed the damned thing into the corner and went to sleep, debating with myself if I could leave it like that.
Of course I couldn’t – It was ¬†a commission piece after all.

So bring back the seam ripper.

The only trouble was that these folded french seams needs really small seam allowance to look¬†good, and the only way to achieve that is by trimming it after you stitched the first seam. This practice, and the fact I’ve done it wrong not one, but twice, meant that I cut of about 1,5 cm on the left shoulder compared to the right. Making¬†the whole garment a bit of.

Once the sleeve was re-set, a third time, I quickly finished and packed the shirt away, out of sight.

The finished medieval shirt:img_0420

img_0388The final result after all the re-stitching.

img_0428Sleeve with ties

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Then it was time to get cracking on the Regency shirt.

This time I didn’t do the same mistake (Hurray!), and the shirt was finished in a few days.

The finished Regency shirt: img_0873

img_0878Metal buttons on a standing collar.

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The two shirts now at their new home.img_0884Lets hope he gets a lot of wear out of them.

2016 in Review

2016 is one of those years we will always remember for it’s tragic events, raising lack of humanity/ compassion for the most vulnerable in our society (and world).

But for me, 2016 will always be one of the mot important years in my life – it’s the year my son was born.

Thus a big change in my priority’s (and time/energy) leaving my sewing somewhat on the backwater.
And taking into account that I had a 6 months hiatus from sewing last winter(Oct 2015 РApril 2016) there is a miracle I managed anything at all. But I did actually finish a few items both before and after my delivery in June.

And here they are:

1790s printed Roundgown:
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Viscose 1790s Roundgown (both with and without baby-bump)IMG_9669

Regency Petticoat IMG_9661

Babyclothes:
Modern:
Jackets, bodys, pants, hats and rompers several of each.IMG_9732 IMG_9915

Historical:
A hat and shirt for a newborn IMG_0282

Halloween:
Henry VIII Costumeimg_1718

Menswear:
(not yet posted about)

Medieval shirt:img_0416

Regency Shirt:img_0861

1950s turquoise viscose dress:IMG_0842

1450s Italian Gown:img_0524

1400s Chemise IMG_0334

1450s Italian Court Gown img_0442

1550s Elizabethan gown:img_1581

Brocade gown img_1480

  Quilted petticoatimg_1033

I’ve also finished a few minor projects like, hemming skirts/pants, sewing curtains/pillows, adjusting dresses etc.

And as always I have a few things on their way which I didn’t manged to finish before the new year (but which hopefully will be completed in he following months).

Al in all I think I did pretty well with my 3 mayor project, which all has been on my wishlist for quite some time.

Medieval Fair S√∂derk√∂ping 2016

A few days after I finished my “Borgia dress” it was time for it’s first outing – To the yearly medieval fair in S√∂derk√∂ping.

This year I had a hard time deciding whether or not I should go, and if I did, then in what way would I attend.
Because of the new baby…
The first thing I needed to decide was If I should go at all, and should I then take him with me?
And If I took him, should I breastfeed or give him the bottle (this is the million dollar question when it comes to clothing decision), and would it be better to wear something old and easy to wash (because, baby spit) instead of my new princess gown?

I had three dresses that I could wear to the event:

1. Italian renaissance
img_0504Pros:
New dress!
Never worn
Soo pretty

Cons:
“Booberella”
Difficult to wash and thous breastfeed in
Never worn….

2. Medieval Cote
IMG_3663Pros:
Comfortable and opportunity to wear a whimple
Perfect for the Fairs time period
Easy to breastfeed in
Well tested and trusted

Cons:
Thick wool = super hot
Difficult to wash
Worn a lot

3. Tudor Peasantsidan-solPros:
Easy to wear
Easy to wash and to breastfeed in
Cons:
Simple on the verge to boring

In the end the choosing was made easy by my boyfriend insisting he take the baby for the day and I go alone (well not alone, my sister was to come to).
This was to be the longest time away from Charlie I ever been, so lets just say I was les then focused when dressing in my gown (New Borgia gown for the win, because – New dress :-)) and kissing my boys goodbye.

img_0919The familiar scenery of Söderköping.

We meet up with the dance team and participated in the show (with only a handful of on-lookers)img_0890

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img_0900I really need to do something about that neckline (or work a bit more on my posture)…

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img_0913Ha ha, love this picture.
Some people do take the dancing a lot more serious ūüėÄ

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After the dance recital me and my sister took a walk around the market.

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img_0922Mmmm fabric….

We also took a few minutes to take some pictures by the big church (while trying our best to ignore the other visitors taking our picture).

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14689770_10210697130606027_928742329_oMedieval selfie ūüôā

Before heading hoe we did a pit-stop at the fabulous fabric store, where I got lots and lots of cute baby fabrics.

Traveling with Baby – Medieval baby sling

For the easiest entry to HSM ever, I started looking into ways to travel with my little one.

Before the use of strollers and the intricate baby carriers that’s becoming more and more popular, people (read women) used the easiest way of tugging their baby’s along – a fabric “sling”.

I will not go into the use of slings and ways to travel with baby’s in past times, since others do it so much better, like¬†Som n√§r det begav sig¬†(link in Swedish). A simple google search will also give you the history from (more or les reliable) sites – most of which sell modern baby carriers and shawls.

The construction of my baby sling/shawl was to make a rectangle 3 x 1m and hem the edges.
I then tied it around my body (under one arm and over the other shoulder) and placed my baby in it.

And that’s that.

And since I sewed it by machine it actually took longer getting dressed for the photoshoot then it did making the sling.

Photos:
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IMG_0226Photo: Maria Petersson
(I only let go of my hands for a second)

The Challenge: Nr 6 2016 – Travel

What: A baby sling

Year: 1500-1600s

Material: 3,5 m of ivory cotton

Pattern: None РI just cut a rectangle 1 x 3,5 m and hemmed it.

Notions: Thread.

How historically accurate is it? The fabric should probably be linen or wool, but since this was meant as a first try I think it would do. the machine stitching are on the other hand not at all accurate. 6/10

Hours to complete: 10 minutes

First worn: Beginning august for photos, but will maybe be used late August for a Medieval fair.

Total cost: 100 Sek (16 Usd)

Final thoughts This was such a cheat. It was way to easy and fast to really count, bu since I did have my baby (!) in June I think I can give myself a break.