Traveling with Baby – Medieval baby sling

For the easiest entry to HSM ever, I started looking into ways to travel with my little one.

Before the use of strollers and the intricate baby carriers that’s becoming more and more popular, people (read women) used the easiest way of tugging their baby’s along – a fabric “sling”.

I will not go into the use of slings and ways to travel with baby’s in past times, since others do it so much better, like Som när det begav sig (link in Swedish). A simple google search will also give you the history from (more or les reliable) sites – most of which sell modern baby carriers and shawls.

The construction of my baby sling/shawl was to make a rectangle 3 x 1m and hem the edges.
I then tied it around my body (under one arm and over the other shoulder) and placed my baby in it.

And that’s that.

And since I sewed it by machine it actually took longer getting dressed for the photoshoot then it did making the sling.

Photos:
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IMG_0226Photo: Maria Petersson
(I only let go of my hands for a second)

The Challenge: Nr 6 2016 – Travel

What: A baby sling

Year: 1500-1600s

Material: 3,5 m of ivory cotton

Pattern: None – I just cut a rectangle 1 x 3,5 m and hemmed it.

Notions: Thread.

How historically accurate is it? The fabric should probably be linen or wool, but since this was meant as a first try I think it would do. the machine stitching are on the other hand not at all accurate. 6/10

Hours to complete: 10 minutes

First worn: Beginning august for photos, but will maybe be used late August for a Medieval fair.

Total cost: 100 Sek (16 Usd)

Final thoughts This was such a cheat. It was way to easy and fast to really count, bu since I did have my baby (!) in June I think I can give myself a break.

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Whaling sharks – Baby clothes

While still on the theme, I also want to show you the cute little pieces I made as a Christmas gift for our friends 6 months old son.

I just couldn’t resist this fabric.IMG_4783

Which I turned into a pair of pants…IMG_4778

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And another romper.IMG_4780This time I included the little foot pieces.

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I think I might get the hang of it by now, since it went so much easier this time around.IMG_4788

Now I’m done whit baby posts (for this time…), and will go back to focusing on historical stuff.

Learning to make Baby Clothes

As I told you in my last post I now have a legit reason to indulge in all the prettiness that is baby clothes.

I bought this pattern about 5 years ago – the first time it looked to be an addition to the family.
And it’s been unopened and forgotten since.IMG_9229But this summer (after the happy news) I dug it out again.

I ‘ve never done baby clothes before, and are quite a newbie at sewing in yersey.
So the decision to leap onto the kids clothes train was a bit of a scary one.IMG_9228 I decided to start with a bodice for the little girl (yeah, pick the most difficult thing you cold find, why don’t you…).

I bought a super cute gender neutral fabric in grey and red, some red knit, white stretch bias tape and snaps.IMG_9231

Then I got to work.

IMG_9250It’s crazy how small amount of fabric you need for these kind of clothes. Compared to my usual sewing that easily swallow 5 m of fabric

I found a twin needle in my stash, and stitched a few test rows before getting the tension right.IMG_9233 IMG_9234

Using the patterns step by step guide (perhaps for the first time), I basted the small reinforcements of the shoulders.IMG_9235

And stitched the reinforcements in the crotch.IMG_9236

Then I turned the seams over, finished the crotch with a twin seam and stitched the bodice pieces together.IMG_9237

Then I set the snaps.IMG_9241They where not very cooperative, and I had to pray a few mistakes lose and try again.

I had some trouble deciding on the size for the ankle cuffs. Since the pattern called for whole foot pieces I couldn’t get any help from there.IMG_9238After some hesitation I decided on the bigger ones – better to big then to small.

I finished the bodice by trimming around the neck and armholes with the red bias tape.

Finished:IMG_9242

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From the leftovers I made a quick little hat.  IMG_4773

Pattern: Burda Kids 9636

Fabric: 0,5 m of cotton yersey.

Notions: Thread, 7 snaps (front and back), 60 cm of bias tape and about 10 cm of red knit.

Time: 2 hours from drafting the pattern to finished.

Cost: about 100 sek – How knew that baby fabric and notions would be so expensive… I’ve made whole dresses for less.

Final thoughts: I’t was really fun to create such a quick and cute pieces. I liked it so much I immediately made another one (in about half the time) for a friends newborn son.