1900s Lacy Shirtwaist

To have something to wear with my new plaid 1900s skirt, I wanted to make a new shirtwaist (I do love my old one but sometimes (ok, always) you want something new).

And in my stash I found this lovely pattern from “Wearing History” which I bought half a year ago when she had a Sale, and I’ve been dying to try it out.

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As the pattern comes as a “print at home” version, the first thing I needed to do was to cut and assemble the pieces. 20150913_114431_resized

Not sure what fabric to use, I searched through my stash and found the last piece of white striped cotton voile (from which I’ve previously made: A Chemise a la Rein, a 1900s pigeon front dress and a 1850s working woman’s shirt/waist), and a newly required of white cotton lace decorated in lovely flowers.
2013-05-29 17.38.05  Unfortunately I hadn’t enough lace to cover the whole shirt – I could either use it on the bodice and make short sleeves, or I could use it to make long/full sleeves and ad a bit of lace around the collar and shoulders.
After some thinking and experimenting with the pattern layout I decided to go with the full sleeves and then try to get as much of the upper bodice out of it as possible.IMG_8785

I realized pretty soon the lace was way to fragile and “open” for the garment I wanted to make. So I dug out some ivory chiffon from my stash and used it to back all the lacy pieces.IMG_8784
The result was perfect. The sleeves kept their lightness, while the see-thoroughness was dampened and strengthened all at the same time.

I stitched most of the blouse on machine, but all the work with the lace needed to be made by hand.

Unfortunately I’ve been really bad at taking pictures lately but besides from the fiddling to get the lace right, the construction is pretty simple.

Before finishing I did needed to make a decision about how to  end the lace on the bodice.
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I could either cut it to the neckline and trim it with lace edgings, or I could save as much as possible of the lace and trim the bottom edge across the back and bust.

In the end I opted for the later, thinking I could always go back and change it at a later date if I want to.

To get that nice pigeon “breast effect” I used bias-tape and a cotton cord to gather the waist.IMG_8862The inside of the blouse.

I made a combination of buttons, buttonholes and metal snaps for the back clouser. IMG_8860

The finished Blouse:
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IMG_8854The facts:

What: A 1905s shirtwaist

Pattern: “Wearing history” 1900s shirtwaist pattern

Fabric: 1 m of striped cotton voile, 0,5 m of cotton lace, 0,5 m of cotton lining for the bodice and 0,3 m of polyester chiffon for backing of the lace.

Notions: Thread, Buttonhole-thread, bias-tape, cotton cord, 10 cm plastic boning, 13 buttons, 7 snaps.

Time: 10-15 hours.

Cost: 400 Sek if everything been bought new, but since everything came from stash and most of the fabrics was leftovers I wouldn’t say even half.

Final thought: I loved working with this pattern, and I have only myself to blame for not making a mock-up since i had a bit trouble getting the collar to fit properly. And I maybe should have skipped out on adding the second layer cotton to the bodice – It may have looked a bit nicer and softer. I also may have to reset the sleeves without the pleats at the shoulders.
But all in all, I’m pretty pleased with the blouse.

Worn with the skirt:
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And a preview from the photoshoot:
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1850/60s (Not a Garbardi) Blouse

Once I’ve decided to make a blouse for some upcoming mid 19th century events this summer it all went pretty fast.

I selected an inspiration pic to base my design upon.
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059d04d3e45d5b72b7ba36bc6a2cd407Shoulder and sleeve detail.

I decided to use the white dotted organza I’ve bought on sale a year ago (which I also used as contrast in my Ariel/Camille dress)
IMG_6253Sorry for the dark photo – I was working late at night

I made a pattern using my green 1840s dress bodice as a base.IMG_6114

To keep the blouse from being totally see through I made a lining in a soft loosely woven cotton fabric. IMG_6267Thin french seams on the lining.

I basted the blouse together, combining darts (in the lining) and gathers (in the organza) to get the right look for the bloused waist. IMG_6255Here you can see the gathered organza (left) and the darted lining (right).

Once I tried it on I found the lining to be a bit high in the neck and cut it down about 4-5 cm.IMG_6259

I stitched the sleeves using french seams and rushing at the cap.
The cuff is just one reinforced, folded piece of organza, closing with a button, to which I gathered the sleeve to. IMG_6274

IMG_6281Sleeve set.

The biggest mistake I made on this project was steaming on fusible interlining to the buttonhole stands. Once sewn to the thin blouse the buttonhole stand looked really bulking and heavy (and white).
So I ripped them of, and not having enough lining fabric left to cut new ones I carefully peeled the interlining of the fabric. IMG_6269What a mess.

Once re-sew (without the interlining) the buttonhole stand looks much better, and it was time to move on to the collar and buttons.IMG_6283Its just a slightly shaped thin strip of organza and lining folded over to make the low standing collar.IMG_6311Then I made all the button holes by hand, added the pearl buttons and sewed on a piece of bias tap to make a casing for the cotton cord used to control the fullness and size at the waist.

IMG_6312Looking neat from the outside…
IMG_6313…And just as neat from the inside.

The finished blouse:

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The Facts:

What: a 1850-1860s blouse/waist

Pattern: I drafted my own using my green 1840s dress bodice and pictures of extant blouses.

Fabric & Notions: 1 m dotted white polyester organza, 0,5 m soft white cotton, 12 plastic buttons, thread, buttonhole thread, 80 cm bias tape and 1,2 m cotton cord.

Time: About 10 hours.

Cost: About 100 Sek (16 Usd) – Everything was bought on sale or leftovers from previous projects.

Final thoughts: I like the look of this blouse, even though I’m not sure the polyester content will keep me as cool as I would have liked in the summer heat. I may make another one out of a more suitable fabric someday, but for now I’m pleased with it. And It was such a quick and easy project.

1850-1860s Blouse/Waist – Inspiration

This summer I will attend at least one (may be as many as three) mid 19th century events, and I’ve been molding over what to wear.

I do have two dresses (green 1840s & pasiley 1850s) from this time period since before, but non which take in to account the (presumed) heat of a nice summer day.

Then I found the perfect solution: A nice cool Garbardi blouse!
(that’s what I thought before the great Isabella of “Isabellas project diary” pointed out my mistake in this great clarifying blog post)

So now I just call it a mid century blouse (or waist)

Here are a few examples I found:

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Garibaldi BlouseRed blouse.

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c2a4f8f1feac545ff90ec8c57e45e46cI adore this whole outfit.

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ad9bf71657ea925d834c20c22246671eSerious rushing.

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162b0a514d40881970d320045db7968aSubtle plaid

f7721379bd23f61c82dcfbe6065e9aceLove the color and pattern on this one.

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Modern “Edwardian” Fashion

Every time I’m in a store I always look for possible costume pieces. The last ccouple of months I bought a pair of great regency-looking boots on sale, some nice shawls, and the perfect pair of pants to my planed steampunk outfit.

So the other day I was killing some time down at the shopping center, looking throuhg some of the biger clothing stores.

I had no intension to buy anything (and didn’t in the end), but I got a pretty hard time holding on to my wallet once I spotted some lovely blouses with a un-mistakenly Edwardian flair.

I spotted this one the moment I stepped in to the store.2014-03-14 16.20.58An ivory coloured cotton chiffong blouse with a lovely decoration and a resonably tight neck.

The blouse closes at the back with 4 buttons.2014-03-14 16.21.58

2014-03-14 16.22.03Close-up on beading and clouser.

This second one was hanging in the same section as the first one.2014-03-14 16.23.17A lovely lace decorated  blouse with a smal collar and front button clouser.

2014-03-14 16.23.30The back is a bit plain, but the blouse still looks great.

2014-03-14 16.23.42Close-up of lace and pin-tucks.

And finaly I found this short jacket on sale.2014-03-14 16.26.20The style would look awsome paried with a nice blouse, skirt and a big hat.

2014-03-14 16.26.32Close-up of sutage decoration.

I love that even if you don’t know how to sew, you can still get a petty nice historical outfit straight from the fashion stores.

Re-make a 1900s shirtwaist

A very late entry to the HSF challenge 18: Re-make.

I’ve been so busy with work, moving and life it-self that I totaly forgot I didn’t do the 18th challenge back in aug/sep. But now finaly I’ve manadged to make it.

I found this blouse on a sale two days ago and emedetly feelt it would be perfect as a late 19th century/early 20th century shirtwaist. The model is completly straight (no darts or shaping what so ever), but do have some lovely detalied tucks and lace work.

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To make it look a bit more historical I needed to make a few changes.

Firstly I needed to give it some shape in the waist era. Sewing the sides and creating a few darts to give it that desired hourglas shape.

Then I needed to lenghten the button clouser n the back – now when the blouse is much tighter you can’t put it on over your head as you could before. Ripping the back seam open and creating a longer buttonhole stand, then sewing the buttonholes and attaching the buttons.

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And as this was a stash project I could only use buttons I already owned, resulting in lots of different buttons.IMG_4529

And lastly I needed to strenghten the neck collor a bit, to keep it standing straght.

As it was a bit to big I started by taking it in. Then I was thinking about putting smal plastic bonning into the created chanels, but with the extra bulk, the collar now manadged to hold itself up. So no bones where needed.

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And that was that, quick and simple. And now it fitt perfectly over a corset.

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Just the Facts:

Challenge: nr 18 – Re-Fashion.

What: a 1900s Shirtwaist out of a modern blouse.

Pattern: None

Fabric; A smal stripe of ream coloured cotton for the buttonhole stand.

Notions: Thread and 8 asorted buttons.

How Historical Accurate: Not at all. The look is accepteble and so is the fabric, but the blouse is factory made and reshaped using modern tecniqukes. So about 2/10.

Time: 2 hours.

Cost: 150 Sek (16 Usd) for the blouse, none for notions who have been in my stash for ages.

First worn: Not yet, but hopefully will be when its gets a litle bit warmer.

Final Thoughts: The re-fashioning was quite easy to make, and I guess you can do this to a lots of garmnents.

The blouse does look a bit odd on the dressform though, but it fits me perfectly, and worn with a high waisted skirt I’m sure it will look faboulus.