New Patterns

This spring and early summer I’ve been indulging in some serious costume related internet shopping.
I’ve been bidding on the most awsome stuff on online auctions (some of which I already shown you here), but for this post I will focus on some of my new sewing patterns.

Lets start things of with some lovely 1950-1960s fashion.IMG_8424Stil nr 2079.

IMG_9281Stil nr 2560

IMG_9722Stil 1564. This one is about 3 sizes to big but I don’t think it is that hard to re-size it.

And some dresses.IMG_8544Simplicity 2963.

IMG_9743Stil 1975.

IMG_8376Simplicity 3069. This one is my favourite, I can defenetly se myself making the green one to wear to parties this fall.

Then some childrens pattern.IMG_9314Stil 8609.

IMG_9313Stil nr?

And a modern baby patternIMG_8547Burda 9636.

Lets move on to the historical patterns.

19th century underwearIMG_9312Simplicity 6769. I made the Chemise for the last HSF challenge from this pattern.

Regency gownsIMG_8293Simplicity 4055. And my yellow regency gown was made using this pattern.

16th century gownsIMG_9745Simplicity 3782. My dream of a Tudor/Elizabethin gown came one step closer with this pattern.

Ok, not historical (No, Westeros do not actually exist), but I couldn’t resist this “Game of thrones” pattern.IMG_9744Simplicity 1487.

Pretty impressive for somebody who use to draft all her patterns herself.

Well my indulgence didn’t stop there. So talking about Historical pattern, I also found some lovely reproduction ones from Neheleniapatterns.com, which all were to tempting to resist.

A Regency spencerIMG_9315Period Impressions 461

Some gentlemans waistcoats.IMG_9320Kannik’s Korner – Man’s Waistcoat

Gentlemens BreechesIMG_9317Country Wives – Narrow fall-front trousers.

Mens Regency coatIMG_9318Rocking Horse Farm – 1795-1820 jacket

A mens military uniformIMG_9319Rocking Horse Farm – Dragoon Uniform

And a late 18th century riding habitIMG_9316Nehelenia Patterns – 1790s Redingote

Well, that was that. Or at least the patterns.
I will show you my new costuming books next time.

Upcoming Regency Planes

Lets do a quick time jump to early 19th century, and take a look at some of my regency planes for this summer.

The_First_Quadrille_at_Almack'sEarlier this year I was asked to host a regency sewing course for the people attending my dance companies regency bal this autumn.

Of course I said yes.

But I’ve just recently started with historical costuming, and know even less about regency. I’ve only made two dresses so far, so how would I be able to guide and teach lots of un-experienced sewers with there evening garbs?

I started asking around for tips on patterns, fabric and other “good to know things”, and pretty soon I developed some sort of plan on how to go about it.

The first decision I made, was to let the participants use comercial patterns – it would be to hard to teach everyone to drape their own. So then I needed to find suatable patterns.

rh838backcoverI’ve tried the “Reconstructing History 838” before and really hated it. The pieces didn’t fit together and the instructions were un-clear. But at least now I know how to go about it to make it work.

gilbert-gownThis pattern comes from Arnolds “Pattern of Fashion” and have a lose placket at the front. It would be nice to give it a try if I only manadge to scale it proper.

hämtaI’ve got lots of recomendations on the “Sense and Sensibillity”s patter. Unfortanly they are not being sold in Sweden, and the cost for shipping was more then I could spare.

simplicity4055Fortuanly I learnt that “Simplicity” had the exact same pattern (and they are sold plenty over here). So I bought it, and are currently on my way to try it out.

I sadly haven’t found any mens wear patterns I would like to try. That will be something to du during summer leeve.

Then I turned my thoughts to the fabrics.

And since I’m cosntantly on the look out for historic fabrics, I’ve already had a few good ones in my stash.IMG_7086This sheer cotton voile have a nice stripe and knot pattern, and originaly comes from a pair of IKEA curtains.

IMG_7081 I bought this white dotted organdy for my Edwardian gown, but It was so cheap Igot the whole bolt – perfect for regency.

IMG_7089This syntetic lace will not be enough for a whole dress, but perhaps I can make an overlay for the skirt and/or sleeves.

But not all regency fabrics hasve to be white.IMG_7082This light yellow cotton voile will be pefect for a model with a slimmer skirt.

IMG_7083I totaly adore this syntetic red curtain bought at Indiska on sale. They also stock white, green and blue. My sister have already claimed it for when I make her regency bal gown.

And lets finish of with some lovely dress models.

1810-two-white-french-mmoaLove the subtle deoration on these clean white dresses.

tumblr_m9dq6ayLMX1qidnqfo1_500A little pop of colour.

05 1810 evening full dressI think my dress will be something like this…

regency dresses collage… or this. I think the yellow voile will be made into somethng like this.

img-thingBeautiful red decoration. You can use the lace in the same fashion as the red fabric on this one.

1807_02_LeBeauMonde_correct_colouringOr why not a whole dress in red.

2881208880_4b0fed8c83So many dresses so litle time.

And if thats not enough, of course we need to make some accessories as well.

 

Floral Anglaise of satin trouble… construction

When I learnt about the 9th challenge in the “HSF” I immediatly knew what I wanted to make. A Robe a l’anglaise – and I even had the perfect fabric.

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A beautiful flowery satin that I bought on sale a couple of months ago, and which just waited to be made in to a pretty gown.

I wilfully ignored that the fabric label said 100 % polyester. This fabric had to be a beautiful dress.

I even had just the right dress pattern for the fabric. From Janet Arnolds “Patterns of Fashion 1”.

img314

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The simple aesthetics of this dress is just lovely, and I felt confident that I was skilled enough to make this one happen.

So I went for it.

I put my corset on my dressform and started to drape. It felt so simple and worked so perfectly that within an hour I had a bodice on the form and a mock up on the way.

Everything fit surprisingly well – this was after all my first real attempt at draping (if you don’t count a few simple school projects). I spread the fabric on the floor and started to cut.  And this was where things started to go bad…

Firstly I realized I din’t have enough fabric for a petticoat, and I really wanted a matching one. I decided to put a hold on cutting the petticoat until the dress was done, and I knew for sure i wouldn’t need any more fabric.

Then the damn satin wouldn’t lie still and started to ripple in every corner leaving shreads of fabric everywhere. I tried to cover the raw edges with overlock, but that ended up shreading of as well. The only solution was to sew quickly. And to handsew all the edges in the skirt.

I somehow managed to put the bodice together for a try on.

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The front looks pretty decent, but the back, the back…

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…is a terrible wrinkly mess!

I had to re-do all the pleatings on the back and very carefully handstitch it down again – this time I interlined the satin with some cotton sheets.

I also had to rise the waistline quite a bit in the sides and back, to get rid of some of the exess wrinkles there. It was somewhere around this time in the process that I started to realise I had to let the Forreau* back go…

*Forreau style back is when you cut the backpiece in one with the skirt, and pleat it so the back is one unbroken line from shoulder to hem.