Bonnets and a Bergeré

This spring/summer have been quite intense regarding sewing for me. And as every costume requires it’s own special headwear I haven’t just been making clothes this spring – there have been quite a lot millenery going on as well.

And since The Huge Picture Hatt alredy got its own post, I thought it was time to show a bit more about some of the other pieces of headwear I’ve been doing/re-doing this summer.

Lets start with the 18th century Bergere.

You might remember it from last year (when I made it from an regular sunhat).IMG_2593

This is how it looked when I found it in my big hat box, and decided to make some changes to it.
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So I un-picked those green pieces of fabric inside the hat (I put them in last year to get something to attach the hair pins in, but it does work better to just push them through the hat).

Then I stitched on some metalic wire at the edge of the brim, and covered it with white bias-tape.
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IMG_7892Then I re-trimmed it with a plain green twill-tape.

And this is how it looked when I wore it with the brim tured up, at the big historic picknic.IMG_8785

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Next up is a  regular straw hat that I’ve turned into a regency bonnet.IMG_7073

I folded the hat in two, made a mark where to cut, IMG_7879

and grabbed the scissors. Make sure to stich the rows down before you cut, so the hat dont un-ravel.IMG_7880

Then I stiched on metal wire along the cut line, and covered it with bias tape.IMG_7889I used white bias tape at first , but decided to change it to a  nude tone twill tape instead, to make it more inviseble.

IMG_8656Close up of brown/nude twilltape.

The un-trimmed hat.
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Then I pinned on some white lace and a big flower brosh I had in my stash.

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IMG_8657Altough it does look pretty, it looks a bit too costumey for my taste.

So I re-trimmed it using another piece of lace and some leftover ribbon from my yellow regency gown paired with a black brosch. Much better.IMG_9198

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And here is how it looked worn togeter with my yellow regency dress.IMG_9132

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And finaly a 1840s bonnet made from skratch.

I used the same pattern (and tecniques) as my brown velvet bonnet, only cut it a bit smaler to get a slimer model for this bonnet.

I used thick canvas and super stiff  interfacing as the inner layers. And a white striped cotton voile for fashion fabric.IMG_7870

Before sewing anything togeter I stiched wire to all the pieces.IMG_7875

It was a bit tricky to sew inside the hat piece.IMG_7882

At least I only broke one needle…IMG_7887

Then it was time to start the hand sewing.  IMG_7890I attached the “lid” and covered it with fashion fabric.IMG_7900Then I stiched on the brim and more fashion fabric (no pictures sorry). And finaly I attached the lining on the inside.

At this stage I was ready to throw it out, it looked so terrible. The fabric was puckering and nothing I did would make it lay flat. I did a final try and decided to trim it to see if that would make it look any better.

It is fantastic what some pieces of lace can do to a domed project. It does actually look presentable.IMG_0454

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An this is how it looked this weekend when I wore it for a photoshoot.IMG_0207(You even get a sneak a peak of my next HSF project)

Camilles Picture (Top) Hat

I decide early that I was going to make an Edwardian hat for the HSF ?: Tops and Toes. My original plan was to make a matching hat to wear together with the prevoulsly made edwardian “Farytale”gown, to a upcoming event.

But as you can guess my planes changed a bit once I decided I hated it, and would never wear the “Ariel/Farytale” gown again.

The new plan is to make a hat be-fitting of the faboulus Camille Clifford. And since the dress is now re-styled after one of her dresses, what would be better then to also make the awsome, gigantic hat to match.Camille21

The only problem was – I’ve never made a hat from scratch before… Ok, I’ve made a 19th century bonnet, but nothing this complex, and huge.

I started searching for some pattern layouts on the internet, and was just about to start the drafting, when I stumbeled on this hat hanging in a store. IMG_7070 Since it was both the perfect size and colour, I took the easy way out and bought it.

Since it was so big I decided it needed a bit of strenghtening to get the right shape. So I grabbed my metal wire and got to work, sewing it on to the brim. IMG_7195Bending the edges of the wire so not to poke through the straw. IMG_7197

Then I did the same thing two more times. IMG_7199

The high crown of the hat neded to be lovered to get the right look.IMG_7188But instead of cutting, I decided to just poke it down on itself.

A few stiches and the crown are now les the half its original hight.IMG_7190And since you will need a hatpin to keep it in place anyway, the low crown dosen’t bother me.

Time to deal with the dcorations. I strated by cuting shreads from some of my black fabric scraps.IMG_7117

Then I gathered them to litle “clusters”, and arranged them beneath the brim. IMG_7308

IMG_7309They look kind of strange sitting on the inside/underside of the hat, but I just follow my inspirtiona picture.IMG_7312Hm a litle weard…

Then it was time for some feathers.IMG_7079I used a feather “boa” I bought for this pourpose.

Triming of those ugly ends.IMG_7314

And carefully stiching the feathers on, cirkeling the crown.IMG_7316

I then realised I didn’t had enough feathers to fill the hole in the crown. So I found some black fabric scraps and made a quick litle bundle.IMG_7317

Which I putt in the crown and attached by a few stiches.IMG_7318

Then I could continue attaching the feathers on to the neewly created lower crown.IMG_7320

And Finished:IMG_7323

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IMG_7553Sneak-a-peak of todays photoshoot…

Just the Facts:

Challenge: nr 7 – Tops and Toes.

What: An Edwardian “Picture hat” (ca 1905s).

Pattern: None

Fabric: Nope

Notions: a black straw hat, thread, steel wire, feathers 1,5m, fabric scraps and ribbons.

Historical accuracy: Not at all. Totaly modern construction. It may pas for edwardian but I doubt the laydy of the day would ever consider wearing it.

Time: 2 hours.

Cost: 150Sek (22Usd)

First worn: At easter for a photoshoot. Maybe I will wear it mid may for an event.

Final thougts: I’m pretty happy about it. And it looks even better since I pinned a satin ribbon and broch to it, to break up all those feathers. I just need to get my hands on some hatpins to keep it more firmly on my head.

1840s bonnet (Gratetude)

As my entry for the HSF Challenge 23 Gratetude, I decided to make a 1840s bonnet.

This desicion was made based on multiple things: I wanted to make something I never done before in a tecnique I never tried, and keeping myself outside the comfort zone.

And I think the early Victorian headwear are both pretty, interesting and would provide a suitable challenge because of the millenery parts.

I also really need to make myself some 1840-1850s headwear to wear to an upcoming event.

This is what I whant to accomplish.

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I found this great and informative blogpost on how to make a bonnet by Susan Biscoe. This post gave me the curage to give it a try.

So I started by draping a pattern.

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I used the left-over velvet fabric of the Masquerade cape, and started to cut the multiple layers.

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All the pieces cut out. From left to right: Velvet, cotton lining, interlining, intefacing and the pattern piece. (I later decided to only use one layers each of the interlining and interfacing).IMG_3836

Using a sick-sack stich to attach the wire to the pattern pieces.IMG_3842

I used a plier to bend the wire into shape.IMG_3846

All wired brim piece.IMG_3851

The crown being attached.IMG_3855And the inside.IMG_3864

Sewing the velvet to the crown.

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And finished with the trimings attached.

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Just the facts:

Challenge: 23 – Gratetude

What: A 1840s bonnet

Pattern: I draped and drafted my own.

Fabric: 0,4 m of: brown cotton velvet, brown cotton lawn, heavy upholstery fabric and 0,2 m of golden satin.

Notions: Thread, heavy interfacing and steel wire.

How Historical Accurat: The shape is pretty good but the construction and sewing are modern, even though it is mostly hand sewn.

Time: 10 hours.

Cost: About 100 Sek (11 Usd)

First worn: Not yet, but will be on dec 16th for a 19th century Christmas party.

Thanks to: First of all I whant to thank the whole costuming comunity, and all the help and support you can find there. You are all great!

A special thanks goes to Leomoni of “the Dreamstress” who got me interested in historic costuming, and through the HSF made me inspired to continue to make historic clothes this past year.

Then I whant to thank Susan Briscoe for the great blogpost who made it look so simple (to make a bonnet) and thous gave me the currage to give it a try.

Last thoughts: I really loved making this bonnet and are already thinking about making an other one. Mabye I should venture deeper in to millenery…

Medieval hair styling

When figuring out the style of my new medieval costume, I also needed to think about hairstyles and headwear. And since my own cropped hair wouldn’t do for any historical hairstyling what so ever, I needed something to cover it up.

I started to seearch for sutable headwear on the internet, but was constantly drawn back to my original inspirational picture:

medieval4The girl is wearing her hair in tails coild at the ears, and some sort of whimple on the head.

And it looks like this girl is wearing the same hairstyle, but without the headcloth.medieval3I also found this picture in “The Medieval Tailors Assistance”, showing the same hairstyle.

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So my next step was to by a wig.

I wanted a long-haired wig, in a colour that would be axcepted as and look simular to mine.

serpentine-rodbrun-peru-1I found this (extremly sexified) wig on the internet for 150 Sek (15 USD). Exept for the bangs, it looked perfect.

But these cheep wigs have a way of being horrible and ugly in real life, so you never know until you tryed it on.

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IMG_2825Turns out it’s GREAT!

The colour and lenght is perfect, and the pretty curls held their shape really well.IMG_2805

But I knew I could not use it as it where because of the bangs, and the heat stroke I would get by wearing a syntetic wig.

So I cut some of the sections of, and collected them into ponytails using smal rubber band, and then made them into braids.IMG_3033

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Then it was time to do the headcloth.

I cut stripes of fabric and sewed a simple headband – on to which I will pin the braided hair and whimple.IMG_3053

It ties in the back with dubble ribbon.IMG_3046

Then I draped the braids on the headband. IMG_3063And secured them by sewing them to the cloth.

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I then cut and hemmed the cresent shaped whimple, and draped it on top of the braids, securing it by pinning it to the headband behind the ears.

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Now I just need to get it to look this good tomorrow – and hopefuly stay that way all night…

A 1913s hat

When posting about my To late for Titanic 1913s dress I got quite a few remarks on my hat, and the ladys who went with me to the Titanic exhibithion also admired it and asked where I bought it.

Well, It is a totaly modern and ordinary sun hat from any clothing store.

IMG_0297All that’s needed was a bit of re-styling.

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So I bought some fejk flowers for decoration. And pleated a white ribbon, and sewed it to the hat in order to hide the black stripe on the crown.

And turned the brim up on one side to get those 1910s look.

IMG_0300I only used the orchids, so the rest of the flowers will be left for some other time.

And the hat being worn.

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It was only a happy coincident that the violet flowers together with my green and white “Titanic dress” symbolizes the collors of the suffragetts.