Heirlome dress – Photoshoot

Only minutes after finishing my new peasant dress, I packed it and left for my sisters house (and her birthday celebration), where we took a few moments to take some photos around the yard – which was the perfect setting for this dress.

I’m wearing: My new Heirloom dress paired with apron and head-cloth/shawl from my National costume, beige woolen shawl, knitted mittens, chemise, petticoat, bloomers and lace up boots.

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IMG_8569Photo: Elin Evaldsdottra

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1850s Swedish Heirlome Farm-dress

Last months HSM15 Challenge was “Heirlome”, and as never inherited anything suitable and knew nothing about my ancestors I had some trouble deciding what to make for this one.

Basically, I could make whatever I liked as long as it heirs from Sweden.
Initially I thought about making another piece for my national costume – like the jacket, embroidered shawl or headpiece, but since time was short (starting 1 week after deadline) I decided to go with a more classic (and fast) alternative.
The 19th century farm girl.

dalsland4I love this pic of a girl in her finest clothes in front of her home. So refreshing an “real” from all the fancy dresses you see in fashion plates and preserved garments.

Since almost everybody in Sweden heirs from farmers, it seemed logical to assume that so did me and my ancestors.

I found this fabric, 3 m blue plaid cotton flannel, at an online auction site for a real steal of a price.IMG_8614

I used my 1840s fan-front dress pattern and cut the fabric down to scraps, carefully matching the plaids.20150903_183856_resized

Then I sewed the dress together.
I made it all in three nights, altering between the sewing machine and hand stitching before the TV, and unfortunately “forgot” to take pictures. The sewing was pretty straight forward, so really noting to write in dept about (read about my last dress like this here)

I did however change a few things, from the original green dress, like:
Using darts to shape the front bodice, instead of fixed gathers. IMG_8635Adding the bodice to the skirt as to make a “whole” dress, and switching the buttons for hooks and eyes.IMG_8638

The finished dress:
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Just the facts:

Challenge: nr 8/2015 – Heirlome

What: A 1850s working woman’s dress – As my ancestors might have worn.

Pattern: Self drafted about 2 years ago.

Fabric: 2,6 m of plaid cotton flanell, 0,5 m of white cotton lining.

Notions: Thread, hook & eyes, 2 m bias tape.

How historical accurate: So so, the look and fabric is plausible, but I sewed most of it on machine and put in some modern techniques. Maybe 6/10

Time: About 10-15 hours

Cost: About 150 Sek (22 Usd)

First worn: For photos September 12.

Final thoughts: Unfortunately I do not love this dress. I like the idea of it much better then the dress itself.
I’t came out a bit to big for me, and being made to work without a corset I feel a bit frumpy wearing it.

IMG_8583Accessorized with apron and head-cloth from my national costume

1860s(ish) 2 hours blue skirt

To have something to go with the hat, and shirt/blouse, my sister also needed some other pieces to make her outfit (why do I do this to myself).

And to save my sanity, I decided on yet another quick and simple project.
A straight skirt sewn on machine.

I had some trouble finding a fabric I liked (and thought my sister would like)20150331_170650Lovely cotton prints, but none that would serve my purposes.

Then I stumbled over this great (and quite loud) print, which I immediately loved.IMG_6758

I started by cutting three widths of fabric the length the skirt needed. IMG_6757

Then I matched the prints at the seams and stitched the widths together.IMG_6756If you look closely you can see the edge.

Then I pleated the upper edge to the right waist measure and added a small strip of fabric for waistband.

I finished by folding and stitching the hem, and adding hooks and eyes for clouser.

The only thing that took some time was the hemming – if I’d sewn it by machine I could have called it my
“1 hour skirt”.

The finished skirt:IMG_6806

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The facts:

What: A 1860s skirt

Pattern: None – just used rectangular pieces

Fabric & Notions: 3,5 m blue patterned light cotton, thread and hooks and eyes.

Time: 2 hours

Cost: about 300 Sek

Final thoughts: The skirt turned out just like I envisioned, and my sister likes it too, The only thing in need of change are to shorten the front a bit to keep my sister from stepping on it.